Uncategorized

The new democratic revolution

The US Intelligence community has predicted the diffusion of power over the next decade; forecasting that authority and control will be distributed among a more diverse set of entities, with no single state wielding supreme power. If we understand this prediction accurately, what they are talking about are multinational corporations and financial institutions, not states. And if we understand THIS accurately, we are actually talking about a greater concentration of power in fewer and fewer hands (the shareholder class) wielded through strictly totalitarian institutions with no democratic mechanisms whatsoever.

In other words, the future of democracy depends on the democratisation of corporate power. That is the next phase. That is the new revolution.

I am the Chief Strategist for the #WeAreAllRohingyaNow Campaign, an effort by independent activists to recruit private sector influence in support of the legitimate rights of the Rohingya minority in Myanmar, the restoration of their citizenship, and ending the genocidal program being carried out on a daily basis by the Burmese military and Buddhist extremists. This campaign can be a launching pad for the overall strategy of democratizing corporate power, and it is this larger goal that I am primarily interested in; though, of course, the immediate goal is resolution of the horrific situation in Arakan.

Obviously, there are a lot of elements to the development of this strategy in terms of tactics, on a grassroots level with consumers, students, and potentially workers, as well as with corporations, business leaders, and shareholders. We are going to need to coordinate on many levels.  Redirecting political activism towards the private sector requires a whole new set of skills, re-education, and understanding market dynamics.

We envision being able to create a scenario where companies recognise the need to reorganize their relationships with customers; the need to present themselves as representatives of their consumer constituencies on issues that matter to them.  We need to create a scenario in which corporations actually acknowledge their political power, and agree to subordinate that power (to one degree or another) to the popular will because if they don’t, they will lose market share. Political agendas and moral stances on social issues need to become part of the equation of doing business.

Obviously, in order to create this scenario, we are initially going to need to educate and mobilize grassroots consumers to build an actual impact on their consumer habits, which we can then use to demonstrate to corporations the need to be responsive.  As I have stated many times in the past, corporations are not moral entities, they do not speak the language of “justice and injustice”; they understand all matters in terms of profit and loss.  This is not a drastically different dynamic than what we have traditionally dealt with when lobbying politicians.  Politicians are also not moral actors; they understand electoral support.  Where a politician fears losing votes, companies fear losing sales.  It is simply a matter of readjusting our sources of leverage.  Indeed, we have far more leverage with companies than we do with governments; we just have to learn how to use it.

Any social or political movement today, whether it is focused on the Rohingya issue or any other, must be able to position itself as an instrument for either delivering to companies the brand loyalty of consumers, or for depriving them of brand loyalty, on the basis of what political stance they adopt on any given issue.

The transfer of power and authority from the public to the private sector has opened a new chapter in the history of anti-democratic measures, and our generation is tasked with ensuring that democracy will not be subverted simply because the dominant powers today are no longer states, but corporations. The private sector is the new front in the democratic revolution.

Driving extremists out…to where? 

There may be few things more difficult than for a Muslim to objectively assess anything Donald Trump says; particularly when he is talking about Islam.

But, if we are honest, a good deal of what he said in Riyadh regarding the Middle East, extremism and terrorism, was quite accurate.  The most obvious inaccuracies, which we have come to expect from any US president, were the glaring omission regarding American atrocities in the region, and the dubious designation of the US and its Arab allies as indisputable agents of all things good and humane. The role this type of narrative has on the spread of radicalization should be obvious.
The arms deal Trump announced between Saudi Arabia and the US translates for most of us as a promise of yet more savagery in Yemen, for example; not to greater regional security.  Telling us that when the US and Saudi Arabia bomb children it is good, and when others do so it is bad, already puts you in a discussion bereft of reason, and radicalization is free to run amok.
Most of what he said about extremism was spot on, however.  Where sensible people would diverge from his comments, though, was where the transcript starts to adopt all capital letters.  After saying that the US does not want “to tell other people how to live, what to do, who to be…” Trump did just that when he instructed the Muslim world on how to deal with extremists.   The author of the Muslim Ban, and the advocate of the Border Wall ordered us to:
“DRIVE THEM OUT of your places of worship.

DRIVE THEM OUT of your communities.

DRIVE THEM OUT of your holy land, and

DRIVE THEM OUT OF THIS EARTH.”
And, of course, this is exactly the opposite of how you can combat extremism.  ‘Driving them out’ of the institutions and communities in which they can find the knowledge and understanding to remedy their misinterpretations is not helpful.  Excluding and ostracizing extremists instead of engaging and educating them, is precisely how an extremist becomes a terrorist.  If you “DRIVE THEM OUT”, they will not disappear, they will integrate with other like-minded, marginalized, and radical people who not only have no real or emotional stake in the society, but who will self-reinforce each other’s misconcepts and misreading of religious texts, and feed on each other’s hatred and resentment in an insular, angry, uninformed sub-culture of extremism.
As I have written before, what we must do, what we are obligated to do, is to invite them to discuss, debate, and exchange ideas and opinions.  Censoring them, shunning them, and so on, is essentially the surest way to move them down the path of radicalization towards eventual violence.  I take no exception to dealing harshly with the perpetrators of terrorism; but this is where we need to distinguish between “extremists” and “terrorists”.  And we need to approach extremism with even more discretion; a person may have radical views on certain points but not on others; and the only way to correct their misunderstandings is through engagement, not banishment.  This is how the Ummah has always addressed extremism, and this is why extremists have always been a relatively minor problem.  
The mistakes of radical interpretation of Islamic Law can often be exposed and debunked by any well-informed Muslim in a matter of minutes, and by a scholar in one or two sentences; but those with extremist views must be present to hear it.

Market Morality: Telenor’s silence alienating consumers                                     عقلية السوق تؤكد أن: صمت تلينور يُنَفِّر عملائها

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

Telenor, I am sure Digi is a good service, consumers in Malaysia could probably benefit from it; but you have to appeal to this market through the issues that matter to the consumers, and you have to adopt the values they share; otherwise it doesn’t matter how great your service is, customers will abandon you; as they have been doing for months now.

The #WeAreAllRohingyaNow Campaign is not your enemy.  We don’t want to see Telenor fail, as it is failing.  But your silence on the Rohingya genocide is starting to look less and less like mere apathy, and more and more like collusion with the bigots and extremists among the government, military, and radical nationalists.

Your recent educational initiative based in monastic schools, excluding the Rohingya, is not the positive PR you hoped it would be; on the contrary, it makes your company appear to be fully aligned with the prejudice and discrimination that is tearing Arakan apart, making day to day life dangerous and miserable for religious minorities like the Rohingya, and undermining even the possibility of reconciliation and peace.

You have to understand that this has a massive impact on the attractiveness of your brand to regional consumers. And it will only get worse the longer you stay silent.  Customers have choices, and they are increasingly making their choices on the basis of how companies behave, not just on the quality and cost of the goods and services they provide.

Telenor needs to get ahead of the curve and adapt to this new dynamic in consumer decision-making.  It is no longer possible for companies to stay aloof from politics; the market rule of supply and demand is starting to include demand for the moral exercise of corporate power.  We want more from you than what you manufacture or provide.

تيلينور، أنا على يقين من أن “ديجي” خدمة جيدة، وأن المستهلكين في ماليزيا يمكنهم جدا الاستفادة منها؛ ولكن عليكم أن تكسبوا وتستميلوا هذا السوق من خلال القضايا التي تهم مستهلكيه، وعليك تبني القيم التي يحملونها ويؤمنون بها، وإلا فجودة خدماتكم لن تهم، وسيتخلى عملائكم عنكم، كما ظلوا يفعلون منذ شهور.

حملة #WeAreAllRohingyaNow ليست عدوة لكم، فنحن لا نريد أن نرى تيلينور تفشل، كما نراها تفشل الأن، ولكن صمتكم على الإبادة الجماعية للروهينجا أصبح يبدو أقل وأقل كمجرد لامبالاة، وأكثر وأكثر كتواطؤ مع كبار الشخصيات والمتطرفين من الحكومة والجيش والقوميين الراديكاليين.

إن مبادرتكم التعليمية الأخيرة التي تركز على مدارس الراهبات فقط، وتستبعد الروهينجا، ليست “العلاقات العامة” الإيجابية التي كنا نأمل أن تكون؛ فعلى العكس تماما هي تجعل شركتك تبدو متوافقة تماما مع التحيز والتمييز الذي يمزق أراكان، مما يجعل الحياة اليومية خطرة وبائسة للأقليات الدينية مثل الروهينجا، ويقوض حتى إمكانية المصالحة والسلام.

لابد أن تفهموا أن ما تفعلونه سيكون له تأثير كبير على جاذبية علامتكم التجارية أمام المستهلكين الإقليميين، وستزداد الأمور سوءا كلما ظللتم صامتين، فالعملاء لديهم خيارات، وهم يتخذون خياراتهم بشكل متزايد على أساس سلوك الشركات، وليس فقط وفقا للجودة وتكلفة السلع والخدمات التي تقدمها هذه الشركات.

تلينور تحتاج أن تعبر هذا المنحنى الزلق وأن تتكيف مع هذه الديناميكية الجديدة في صنع قرار المستهلكين. لم يعد من الممكن للشركات أن تظل بعيدة عن السياسة؛ فقانون السوق الخاص بالعرض والطلب بدأ يشمل “طلب” الممارسة الأخلاقية لسلطة الشركات… أي أننا نريد منكم أكثر من مجرد ما تصنعون أو ما تقدمون من خدمات.

Democracy and the private sector                 الديمقراطية والقطاع الخاص

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

When the discontent of the masses over their marginalisation by rich elites is expressed in elections, you get Trump; when it is expressed in disruption of elite interests, you get change. This is how you democratise unaccountable power.

The real existing power structure is untouched by the political democratic process; you can’t vote the rich out of power.  They are permanent incumbents. All you can do is vote in and out of office those who will serve them.  As long as this is the case, political democracy actually serves to deter, not preserve, democratic representation.

Our challenge in the coming decades will be to redirect mass activism towards the power of the private sector; to impose accountability on what is now the impunity and sovereignty of the super-rich.   We need to assert our rights as customers and workers to  political representation by the corporations we built by our consumerism and labour.  We are entering a new stage in the history of democracy; the democratisation of corporate influence.

عندما تعبر الشعوب عن سخطها على تهميش النخب الغنية لها، ويكون هذا التعبير في صورة انتخابات، فستحصل على أشخاص مثل ترامب، أما عندما يتم التعبير في صورة تعطيل مصالح النخبة، هنا فقط يمكن أن نحصل على التغيير، تلك هي الطريقة التي يمكننا بها أن نعيد هذه السلطة غير الخاضعة للمساءلة إلى المسار الديمقراطي.

هيكل السلطة القائم والحقيقي لا تمسه العملية السياسية الديمقراطية؛ إذ لا يمكن أن نقوم بالتصويت ضد الأغنياء ليتركوا السلطة، فالأغنياء هم شاغلوا السلطة الدائمون. كل ما نستطيعه هو أن نقوم بالتصويت لإدخال بعضهم إلى السلطة وإخراج بعضهم الأخر بناء على من منهم يخدمنا، وطالما أن تلك هي الحالة فلن تكون الديمقراطية السياسية إلا معوقة للتمثيل الديمقراطي بدلا من أن تكون محافظة عليه.

التحدي الماثل أمامنا في العقود المقبلة هو إعادة توجيه الزخم الجماهيري نحو قوة القطاع الخاص؛ لفرض المساءلة على ما تحول اليوم إلى إفلات من العقاب وسيادة للأغنياء.  نحن بحاجة إلى تأكيد حقوقنا، كعملاء وعمال، في أن تقوم الشركات التي بنيناها بإستهلاكنا وعملنا، بتمثيلنا سياسيًا… نحن على أعتاب مرحلة جديدة في تاريخ الديمقراطية؛ وهذه المرحة تسمى: تحويل نفوذ الشركات إلى المسار الديمقراطية.

Telenor’s failing strategy of silence             تلينور واستراتيجية الصمت المعيبة

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

The #WeAreAllRohingyaNow Campaign has been reaching out to Norwegian telecom company Telenor for several weeks now, encouraging them to stand with companies like Unilever against the ongoing genocide of the Rohingya in Myanmar, and to support the implementation of United Nations recommendations, including the restoration of Rohingya citizenship.

Telenor has invested over a billion and a half dollars in Myanmar and has more than 80,000 points of sale across the country, with plans for further expansion.  They are a company with considerable influence in Myanmar.
Telenor has publicly supported UN goals on reducing inequality and they promote an image of themselves as a “socially responsible” and culturally sensitive company. However, direct correspondence with Telenor CEO Sigve Brekke has gone unanswered, social media activists have been temporarily blocked from executives’ Twitter accounts, and even though the Telenor hashtag is now dominated by messages encouraging the company to take a moral stand against the ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya, and these messages experience far greater interaction than anything posted by Telenor themselves, the company remains unresponsive.

It appears that their marketing department believes all they have to do to win customers in the region is to regularly tweet about cricket matches and announce special promotions; but that they do not have to extricate themselves from the growing perception that they are a company complicit in the crimes being committed against the Rohingya by the Myanmar government on a daily basis.

But a company cannot claim to be socially responsible while simultaneously being unresponsive to the concerns of the society.  We have been urging Telenor to understand that consumers in the Southeast Asian region care deeply about the Rohingya issue, and that their market choices are going to reflect this concern.  Silence in the face of genocide is not only immoral; it is an extremely bad business strategy in a region where the public cares about the issue.

Telenor’s most recent quarterly report substantiates this.  Subscribers in Malaysia for Telenor’s Digi service have been switching to other providers by the hundreds of thousands.  The company’s profits in Malaysia have fallen nearly $100 million below projections.  Stock traders have downgraded the value of Telenor’s  appeal and are anticipating turbulence in the company’s share price.  This is partly due to European Commission allegations that Telenor is guilty of anti-competition practices, but of course, it is also due to the dramatic deterioration of their market share in this region and their subsequent failure to meet profit goals.

Telenor’s silence on the Rohingya genocide is stigmatizing the company in Southeast Asia.  This is the Catch-22 situation for any company that has chosen to use Myanmar as a launching platform for penetrating the regional market.  They invest in Myanmar so they can access customers in the region, but by being in Myanmar, they are alienating those customers, because of the actions of the government.  The only solution to this Catch-22 conundrum, the only way they can make their investments in Myanmar pay off, is if they decide to use the leverage their investments give them to press for a political resolution to the issue.  There is nothing Telenor could possibly do that would win them more customer loyalty and appreciation in the region than this.

The #WeAreAllRohingyaNow Campaign has no animosity towards Telenor or any other multinational corporation invested in Myanmar; and we want to see them succeed.  They can improve the quality of goods and services, create jobs, and enhance the standard of living for the whole population.   But, in order for that to actually happen, it simply cannot be at the expense of the lives of over a million innocent Rohingya.  If Telenor embraces the values held by consumers in this region, consumers in this region will embrace Telenor.  If they ignore our concerns, the market will continue to turn away from them.

It is that simple.

ظلت حملة #WeAreAllRohingyaNow تحاول التواصل مع شركة الاتصالات النرويجية تلينور لعدة أسابيع الآن، وتشجيعهم على الوقوف مع شركات مثل يونيليفر ضد الإبادة الجماعية الجارية ضد الروهينجا في ميانمار، ودعم تنفيذ توصيات الأمم المتحدة، بما في ذلك استعادة الروهينجا لجنسيتهم التي سلبت منهم.

لقد استثمرت تلينور أكثر من مليار دولار ونصف في ميانمار ولديها أكثر من 80،000 نقطة بيع في جميع أنحاء البلاد، ولديها خطط لمزيد من التوسع، وكل هذا يجعلها شركة ذات تأثير كبير في ميانمار.

ثم أن دعمت تلينور بشكل علني أهداف الأمم المتحدة بشأن الحد من عدم المساواة، وتقدم نفسها باعتبارها شركة “مسؤولة اجتماعيا” ومتفاهمة مع الثقافات المختلفة. ومع ذلك، فإن مراسلة الرئيس التنفيذي لشركة تلينور سيغفي بريك، بشكل مباشر، ظلت بلا أي تجاوب من ناحيته، كما قام بعض المديرين التنفيذيين بحظر بعض النشطاء من وسائل التواصل الاجتماعي من حسابات تويتر، ومع ذلك فإن أوسمة تلينور على تويتر الآن تهيمن عليها رسائل لحث الشركة على اتخاذ موقف أخلاقي ضد التطهير العرقي للروهينجا، وهذه الرسائل تلاقي تفاعل أكبر بكثير من أي شيء نشرته تلينور نفسها، ومع ذلك فإن الشركة لم تستجب بعد.

يبدو أن قسم التسويق في هذه الشركة يعتقد أن كل ما عليه فعله لكسب العملاء في المنطقة هو التغريد بانتظام عن مباريات الكريكيت والإعلان عن العروض الترويجية الخاصة؛ ولكنهم لا يرون أن عليهم إخراج أنفسهم من ورطة التصور المتزايد بأنهم شركتهم متواطئة مع الجرائم التي ترتكبها حكومة ميانمار ضد الروهينجا بشكل يومي.

لا يمكن أن تدعي أي شركة أنها مسؤولة اجتماعيا بينما هي لا تستجيب بأي شكل لهموم المجتمع، لقد ظللنا نحث تلينور على فهم أن المستهلكين في منطقة جنوب شرق آسيا يهتمون بعمق بقضية الروهينجا، وأن خياراتهم في السوق ستعكس هذا القلق، وأن الصمت في وجه الإبادة الجماعية ليس شيئا غير أخلاقيا فحسب؛ بل هو استراتيجية عمل سيئة للغاية في منطقة يهتم جمهورها بهذه القضية.

تقرير تلينور الربع سنوي الأخير يثبت ما أقوله: فمئات الألاف من المشتركين في خدمة تلينور ديجي في ماليزيا راحوا يحولون إلى مقدمي خدمات آخرين، وانخفضت أرباح الشركة في ماليزيا إلى ما يقرب من 100 مليون دولار أقل من المتوقع لهم. كما قلل متداولو الأسهم من الطلب على أسهم تلينور مع توقع المزيد من الاضطراب في سعر سهم الشركة. قد يرجع ذلك جزئيا إلى ادعاءات المفوضية الأوروبية بأن تلينور تواجه اتهامات بممارسات مناهضة للمنافسة، ولكن بطبيعة الحال، قد يرجع ذلك أيضا إلى التدهور الكبير لحصتها السوقية في هذه المنطقة وفشلها اللاحق في تحقيق أهدافها الربحية.

صمت تلينور على الإبادة الجماعية ضد الروهينجا يسئ لسمعة الشركة في جنوب شرق آسيا، فهذا هو الوضع الأكثر حرجا وخنقا لأي شركة تختار أن تجعل من ميانمار منصة انطلاق تخترق منها السوق الإقليمية. فهم يستثمرون في ميانمار حتى يتمكنوا من الوصول إلى العملاء في المنطقة، ولكن وجودهم في ميانمار يجعلهم يُنَفِرون عملائهم، بسبب تصرفات الحكومة. الحل الوحيد للخروج من هذه الوضعية الحرجة والخانقة، والطريقة الوحيدة التي يمكن أن تجعل استثماراتهم في ميانمار ذات جدوى، هي إن قرروا استخدام نفوذ استثماراتهم للضغط من أجل التوصل إلى حل سياسي لهذه القضية. لا يوجد شيء أكثر من هذا يمكن أن تفعله تلينور حتى تكسب المزيد من ولاء وتقدير العملاء في هذه المنطقة.

حملة #WeAreAllRohingyaNow ليست لديها أية عداء تجاه تلينور أو أي شركة أخرى متعددة الجنسيات استثمرت في ميانمار، فنحن نريد أن نراهم ينجحون. وتلينور يمكنها أن تحسن من نوعية سلعها وخدماتها، وتخلق فرص للعمل، وتحسن من مستوى معيشة السكان. ولكن حتى يحدث أي من هذا فعليا، فهو لن يتم أبدا على حساب حياة أكثر من مليون شخص من الروهينجا الأبرياء. إن قامت تلينور باحتواء قيم المستهلكين في هذه المنطقة، فإن المستهلكين سيحتوون تلينور، أما إذا تجاهلوا مخاوفنا، فإن السوق سيستمر في الابتعاد عنهم.

هكذا بمنتهى البساطة!

Independent opposition to the IMF

screenshot_2016-10-09-21-19-53-01

(To be published in Arabic for Arabi21)

On October 9th, the IMF was scheduled to announce the release of the first tranche of money from a $12 billion loan to Egypt.  Approximately 2 weeks before the announcement was to be made, individual Egyptians self-mobilised, without instruction from party leaders or groups, and began sending messages to the IMF representative in Egypt, and to the local offices of multinational companies, expressing opposition to the loan and its accompanying Austerity program.

 

Messages warned that, since the neoliberal policies demanded by the IMF are designed to benefit multinationals and foreign investors, the revolutionary movement would impose consequences on the private sector if the loan proceeds.  A few days before October 9th, the IMF announced that the decision on the loan would be indefinitely delayed. The American, British, and Canadian embassies issued alerts to all their citizens in Egypt to beware of possible risks around the 9th of October.  The Ministry of Finance began hiring recent graduates to open at least 2 Facebook accounts each to promote a positive opinion about the loan on social media.

 

In short, the people forced their way to the IMF negotiating table.

 

Christine Lagarde, Head of the IMF, suddenly began to include mention of the Egyptian people when discussing the policy reforms required by the loan, “I think the measures that the Egyptian authorities…and the Egyptian population are considering in order to improve the economy are the right ones”, she said in an interview with Al-Jazeera.  As there has not been any referendum on the loan in Egypt, and the population had no role in negotiating the agreement with the IMF, Lagarde is implicitly acknowledging that, by their collective action, the Egyptian people have suddenly made themselves part of an equation from which they had been very deliberately excluded; and the acquiescence of the population is now an issue for the IMF, though it never has been before.

 

This is a significant development at the most critical moment Egypt has faced since 2011.  This will be the biggest loan the IMF has ever granted anyone in the region, and it will force policies on Egypt that will drastically undermine the country’s potential for economic sovereignty and political independence, regardless of who may sit in the presidential palace.  The Islamist opposition has been uniformly silent, conspicuously so, even the new Ghalabah Movement, which has organized mass protests for November 11th and claims to represent the poor and downtrodden of Egypt. Nevertheless, the people took the initiative against the loan despite the apparent apathy of their leadership.  All the opposition parties should take note of this fact.

 

Frequently I have been told by Islamists that the ordinary people cannot understand the complexities of economics.  If the collective action of the Egyptian people, acting as individuals to oppose the loan, was not sufficient to disprove this theory, we saw recently the powerful comments by a tuk-tuk driver in Egypt eloquently summarizing the economic situation in the country, better than anyone from the Islamist elite.

 

It is well past time for the Islamist opposition to begin finally to address the real policy issues that are intensifying the suffering of the Egyptian people.  It is time to stop playing politics and jockeying for position, and it is time for them to use their platforms to discuss the specific issues that are affecting the daily lives of the masses, because the masses are not waiting.

هل هي إدارة جديدة في مصر؟                   New management in Egypt?

من الغريب أنني كنت أفكر الأسبوع الماضي في إمكانية ترشح جمال مبارك للرئاسة المصرية . والآن هو، على ما يبدو، يعتزم القيام بذلك.

لقد كنت أفكر في ذلك لسببين: أولا، لأن هناك نوع من الحنين إلى الماضي كثيرًا ما يميل للظهور على السطح بعد بضع سنوات من الإطاحة بأي دكتاتور، ولا سيما عندما يكون خليفته أكثر وحشية أو أكثر انعدامًا للكفاءة مما كان عليه.  وفي مصر، يبدو بشكل واضح أنه لا يمكن أن تكون هناك عودة لحسني مبارك، لهذا فجمال مبارك يبدو كخيار واضح.

فهو شاب و”مدني” بشكل أساسي، بل ويمكن أن يبني حملته على أساس أنه سيكون زعيم ديمقراطي يتعهد بتحقيق تطلعات “الربيع العربي”، بل ويهاجم الدكتاتورية العسكرية للسيسي، فمن الواضح أنه أكثر تعليمًا وثقافة من السيسي، بل وأكثر تأهيلاً لمنصب سياسي، وأنا متأكد من انه سيتمكن من كسب تأييد شعبي كبير.

وكنت أفكر في هذا الاحتمال أيضا لأن هناك مؤشرات في لغة الخطاب الأخيرة لصندوق النقد الدولي تشير إلى أن مجتمع الأعمال الدولي يريد أن يرى حصة الجيش المصري في الاقتصاد إلى تفكك، وهذا بمثابة إنذار للسيسي بأنه قد أصبح زائدًا عن الحاجة.

جمال مبارك نيوليبرالي بكفاءة وإخلاص، وقد دعا منذ فترة طويلة للخصخصة الكاملة للاقتصاد المصري، بما في ذلك الأصول الخاضعة لسيطرة الجيش حاليا، لهذا فمرة أخرى، هو خيار واضح.

والسؤال: كيف سيتم إجبار الجيش للتخلي عن السلطة وعن مصالحه الاقتصادية؟

التخلي عن السلطة قد لا يكون معقدًا كما يبدو. في الواقع، سيكون تحرك حكيم جدًا للجيش، فهم ليسوا في حاجة للسلطة من أجل مواصلة دورهم الاقتصادي، لأنها في الحقيقة تتعارض مع استقرارهم المؤسسي، وتعرضهم لردود أفعال عنيفة وسلبية. فمن وجهة نظر تجارية بحتة، بل ومن المنطقي أن يعملوا بعيدًا عن الرأي العام.  ولكن واحدًا من الأسباب الرئيسية، إذا لم يكن السبب الرئيسي، وراء الانقلاب كان هو خوف الجيش من فقدان حصته الاقتصادية؛ لهذا فحملهم على الانسحاب من الحياة السياسية سيتطلب أولا نوعًا من الضمانات أن مشاريعهم ستبقى على حالها، وهذا على ما يبدو شيء قد لا ترغب الأعمال التجارية الدولية أن تقدم فيه أية تنازلات. ولكني أعتقد أن هذا أمر يمكن التفاوض فيه بما يرضي كلا من أصحاب رؤوس الأموال العالمية وكبار قادة الجيش.

الجزء الأكبر من القوة الاقتصادية للجيش منذ الانقلاب لم يعد ينبع بالكلية من الهيمنة الفعلية على المشاريع الضخمة، ولكن من قدرتهم على الاستفادة من نفوذهم عبر مجموعة واسعة من المشاريع، التي تمولها رؤوس الأموال الأجنبية وأغنياء المصريين، مما ترك الجيش (بشكل عملي) عرضة لضغوط مموليه.  فبقدر ما تحولت الشركات والمؤسسات إلى أدوات مالية أولا، ثم إلى صناعات إنتاجية ثانيًا، بقدر ما نستطيع أن نتصور أنه من الممكن أن تتم إعادة تشكيل حصة الجيش ببساطة، والسماح لهم، على سبيل المثال، باستثمار صناديق التقاعد (ربما) في الشركات التي ستتم خصخصتها.  أو شيء من هذا القبيل.

لن يكون سلب الاقتصاد من الجيش المصري أمرًا سهلًا أو مباشرًا، لا شك، ولكن من المعقول أن يتم السعي وراء هذا الأمر بشكل تدريجي. ويبدو أن هذا مسار حتمي للبرنامج النيوليبرالي في مصر، كما يبدو أيضًا أن إمبراطورية رأس المال ستفضل جمال مبارك، عن غيره، للإشراف على هذه العملية.

تنويه: هذه النسخة منقحة ونهائية!  

 

Oddly enough, I was just thinking last week about the possibility of Gamal Mubarak running for the Egyptian presidency; and now it seems, he intends to do it.I was thinking about it for two reasons. First, because a kind of nostalgia often tends to emerge a few years after a dictator has been overthrown; particularly when his successor is more brutal or more incompetent than he was. And, in Egypt, there clearly cannot be a return to power by Hosni Mubarak, so Gamal Mubarak would be the obvious choice.

He is young, technically “civilian”, and could even campaign as a democrat vowing to fulfill the aspirations of the “Arab Spring”, and attacking the military dictatorship of Sisi. He is obviously more educated than Sisi, and indeed, more qualified for political office. I am sure he would garner considerable popular support.

I was also thinking about this possibility because there have been indications in the recent language of he IMF that the international business community wants to see the Egyptian army’s stake in the economy broken up; which is tantamount to Sisi being given a redundancy notice.

Gamal Mubarak is a devout neoliberal; he has long advocated the complete privatization of the Egyptian economy, including the assets currently under the army’s control. So, again, he is the obvious choice.

The question is: how will the army be forced to give up its power and economic interests?

Giving up power may not be as complicated as it seems. In fact, it would be the wisest move for the military. They do not need to be in power to continue their economic role; it actually interferes with their institutional stability, and exposes them to negative backlash. From a business perspective, it makes more sense for hem to operate out of public view. But one of the major reasons, if not THE reason for the coup was the army’s fear of losing their economic stake; so getting them to withdraw from politics will first require some sort of guarantees that their enterprises will remain intact; and this appears to be something that international business may not want to concede. But I believe this is a matter that can be negotiated to the satisfaction of both the global owners of capital and the army CEOs.

A lot of the army’s economic power since the coup stems not so much from actual domination of mega projects, but from their ability to leverage their influence across a broad spectrum of enterprises, financed by foreign capital and rich individual Egyptians.  Practically speaking, that leaves the military vulnerable to pressure from their financiers.  Insofar as companies and corporations have  turned into financial instruments first, and productive industries second; it is conceivable that the army’s stake can simply be reconfigured, allowing them, for instance, to invest pension funds perhaps in privatized companies; or something along those lines.

It is not an easy or straightforward thing to divest the Egyptian military from the economy, no doubt.  But it is plausible that it can be pursued incrementally; and it does appear that this is the inevitable trajectory of the neoliberal program for Egypt; and it may well be that the Empire of Capital will favor Gamal Mubarak to oversee this process.

Dismantling European democracy

Screenshot_2016-09-03-15-05-05-01.jpeg

(To be published in Arabic for Arabi21)

Yanis Varoufakis, the former Greek finance minister for the Syriza government, is quickly becoming the most dangerous man in Europe.  Why? Because he wants to democratize the EU, and because he is exposing how desperately it needs to be democratized.

 

Varoufakis resigned from the Syriza cabinet (under pressure), when he refused to accept the Austerity plan of the Troika and another massive tranche of new IMF loans that would have enslaved the Greek economy under an un-payable  burden of unprecedented debt.

 

But for five months, the radical Left-wing economist got an inside look at the power structure in Europe, the way decisions are made; and now he is energetically, and eloquently, sharing with the people of Europe what he saw. And it is shocking.

 

When Varoufakis first entered office, he attended a meeting of the Euro Group, which includes the finance ministers of all the EU countries that use the Euro.  The Euro Group is presided over by the Troika, which is comprised of representatives from the European Commission, the European Central Bank, and the IMF.  Varoufakis addressed the ministers regarding the Austerity plan they had demanded for Greece, and which the Greek people had elected Syriza specifically to oppose.  He told them that the new government was willing to compromise with the Troika, but that they also had a responsibility to the electorate; to fulfill their promises to the Greek people, and to take steps to grow the domestic economy.  In short, he was saying that the Troika’s plan would have to be changed to reflect the will of the Greek population, and to serve the interests of revitalizing the economy.  Varoufakis was promptly interrupted by Wolfgang Schoible, the finance minister of Germany, who said, “Elections cannot be allowed to change the economic policy of Greece.”

 

The Troika presented Varoufakis with the IMF loan offer along with a comprehensive Austerity plan that would determine Greece’s economic policy for the next 20 years.  Christine Lagarde, the director of the IMF conceded to Varufakis that the structural adjustment program would not work, but that it was nevertheless necessary to accept it for his own political credibility, and to protect the Troika’s ‘investment of political capital’ in the effectiveness of Austerity.   Basically, the political power of the IMF to dictate economic policies that bankrupt nations must be upheld, no matter what.

 

Why?

 

That is an important question.  Schoible answered this in a private conversation with Varoufakis when he told him that none of the periphery countries, like Greece, can be allowed to challenge Austerity because the aim is to “take the Troika to Paris.”  In other words, they want to centralize and monopolize control over economic policy in even Europe’s most important economies; to dominate the entire continent, and in so doing, subvert any still existing democratic mechanisms.

 

It is telling that Varoufakis believes it would constitute enough of a revolutionary and democratizing action to simply demand that the closed meetings of the Euro Group be live streamed on the internet.  That is just how un-democratic the EU decision making process is: it could not safely take place in front of the public

 

All of this will come as a tremendous surprise to most of us in the Muslim world, since we imagine that Europe is a great center of democracy.  Varoufakis is tearing down that illusion for us, and for the people of Europe;  he is exposing the reality of private power and the anti-democratic nature of global capitalism today.  We would all be well advised to listen carefully to his message, and adapt our strategies for liberation according to the invaluable information he is giving us.

عن اعتزال الفِرَق                                     On avoiding sects…

روي في الصحيحين وفي غيريهما عَن أَبِي إِدْرِيْس الْخَوْلَانِي أَنَّه سَمِع حُذَيْفَة يَقُوْل:

“كَان الْنَّاس يَسْأَلُوْن رَسُوْل الْلَّه-صَلَّى الْلَّه عَلَيْه وَسَلَّم- عَن الْخَيْر، وَكُنْت أَسْأَلُه عَن الْشَّر مَخَافَة أَن يُدْرِكَنِي، فَقُلْت: يَا رَسُوْل الْلَّه، إِنَّا كُنَّا فِي جَاهِلِيَّة وَشَر فَجَاءَنَا الْلَّه بِهَذَا الْخَيْر فَهَل بَعْد الْخَيْر شَر؟ قَال: نَعَم. فَقُلْت: فَهَل بَعْد هَذَا الْشَّر مِن خَيْر؟ قَال: نَعَم وَفِيْه دَخَن، قَال قُلْت: وَمَا دَخَنُه؟ قَال: قَوْم يَسْتَنُّون بِغَيْر سُنَّتِي وَّيَهْدُوْن بِغَيْر هَدْيِي تَعْرِف مِنْهُم وَتُنْكِر، فَقُلْت هَل بَعْد ذَلِك الْخَيْر مِن شَر؟ قَال: نَعَم فِتْنَة عَمْيَاء دُعَاة عَلَى أَبْوَاب جَهَنَّم، مَن أَجَابَهُم إِلَيْهَا قَذَفُوْه فِيْهَا. فَقُلْت: يَا رَسُوْل الْلَّه، صِفْهُم لَنَا، قَال: نَعَم، قَوْم مِن جِلْدَتِنَا وَيَتَكَلَّمُوْن بِأَلْسِنَتِنَا، فَقُلْت: يَا رَسُوْل الْلَّه، وَمَا تَأْمُرُنِي إِن أَدْرَكْت ذَلِك، قَال تَلْزَم جَمَاعَة الْمُسْلِمِيْن وَإِمَامَهُم قُلْت فَإِن لَم يَكُن لَهُم جَمَاعَة وَلَا إِمَام؟ قَال: فَاعْتَزِل تِلْك الْفِرَق كُلَّهَا، وَلَو أَن تَعَض عَلَى أَصْل الْشَّجَرَة حَتَّى يُدْرِكَك الْمَوْت وَأَنْت عَلَى ذَلِك”.

يبدو لي أن ما حدث بعد تفكك الدولة العثمانية؛ أي بعد تقسيم بلاد المسلمين إلى دول قومية وابتداع الجنسيات، وبالتالي القوميات، يمكن أن يُقَارن منطقيًا بالفترة الموضحة في الحديث أعلاه حيث لا يوجد كيان رئيس للمسلمين يوحدهم تحت إمارة إمام واحد، والدول القومية نفسها، في هذه الحالة، يمكن اعتبارها كفِرَق.

والفِرَق المتمثلة في الدول القومية تؤدي إلى ظهور فِرَق فرعية؛ مثل الجماعات المعارضة والجماعات المتطرفة، والحركات الانفصالية…الخ، وكل هذه الفِرَق في تفسيرها وتطبيقها للدين منشغلة بأمور قومية، وتركز اهتمامها على القضايا الدولانية والهوية الثقافية، كما هي حالة العديد من المنظمات الاسلامية اليوم.

أرى أن المفكرين من جماعة الإخوان المسلمين في مصر، على سبيل المثال، أو من الجماعة الإسلامية في باكستان، يميلون إلى تفسير الدين من خلال عدسة الظروف الاجتماعية والسياسية التي كانوا يعيشون فيها، وبهدف تجنيد العقيدة الدينية في دعم أهدافهم السياسية، بدلا من تفسير ظروفهم من خلال عدسة الدين، وبدلا من اشتقاق أهدافهم السياسية من العقيدة الدينية.  هؤلاء المفكرين، وتفسيراتهم، أصبحوا هم المرجعية التي تنتمي إليها الجماعات الإسلامية، مما يجعلهم أقرب لشكل الفِرَق.  إلى حد ما، هذا النمط لا مفر منه لأية مجموعة، فمنظريهم ومفكريهم يصبحون هم السلطة الدينية لهذه الجماعات، فهم فقهائها، ومفسريها، حتى إن لم يكونوا مؤهلين لهذه الأدوار، وحتى لو اختلفت رؤاهم لبعض الأمور بشكل كبير عن الإجماع التاريخي.  ونتيجة لهذا النمط، تنعزل معرفة وفهم أعضاء المجموعة، وبقدر أو بآخر، تصبح مشوهة.  مرة أخرى، هذه الظاهرة أقرب ما تكون لشكل الفِرَق.

في الغالب نحن عندما نتحدث عن “البنيان الرئيسي” للمسلمين، فنحن لا نتحدث عن مجموعة بشكل حرفي، بل عن توافق في العقيدة والتفسير يتمسك بالإجماع والتفسير المبنيين خلال الأجيال السابقة.  في هذه الحالة، فقد أخبرنا نبينا ﷺ أن نتمسك بالجماعة، وهي نفس نصيحته في ظل غياب الجماعة، لآننا بهذا نعزل أنفسنا عن الفِرَق.  فإذا لم تكن هناك جماعة (أي إن لم يكن هناك أي تمثيل فعلي للمعتقدات الراسخة لأهل السنة والجماعة)، فالمطلوب منا مرة أخرى هو تجنب كل الفِرَق، أي ببساطة عزل أنفسنا. وفي كلتا الحالتين، فخلاصنا يكون في الامتناع عن الانضمام إلى أي من الفِرَق التي قد تنشأ، لأنهم “دُعَاة عَلَى أَبْوَاب جَهَنَّم”.

يجب أن نذكر هنا أن تعبير “دُعَاة عَلَى أَبْوَاب جَهَنَّم” لا يعني بالضرورة أنهم وأتباعهم سيعاقبون بالخلود في جهنم، ولا يعني بالضرورة أنهم مرتدون يدعون الآخرين إلى الردة، ولكنه يعني ببساطة أن أخطائهم خطيرة بحيث أنها تشكل كبائر، وبهذا سيستحقون عقوبة الله.

من حيث التنبؤ بالمستقبل، فهذا الأمر مفيد لأنه يخبرنا أن النصر النهائي للإسلام لن يأتي على يد أي من هذه الفِرَق، لا من الفِرَق التي في شكل دول قومية ولا من الفِرَق الفرعية التي تعمل بداخلها. في المقابل، فإن النصر سيأتي من التمسك بالبنيان الرئيسي للمسلمين والتمسك بالتوافق الذي تم بنائه في العقيدة والتفسير.

In the Two Sahihs, and elsewhere,  it is reported on the authority of Abu Idris Al-Khawlany that he heard Hudhayfah ibn Al-Yaman say:“People used to ask the Messenger of Allah  about the good, but I used to ask him about the evil lest it should afflict me.

Once I said, “O Messenger of Allah! We were living in ignorance and evil, then Allah bestowed upon us this goodness (i.e. Islam), so will there be evil after this goodness?” He said, “Yes”. I said, “Will there be goodness after that evil?” He said, “Yes, but in it there will be Dakhan (blemish, impurity).” I said, “What will its Dakhan be?” He said, “A people following a way other than my way (Sunnah) and calling to a guidance other than my guidance; you will approve of some of their actions and disapprove of others.” I said, “Will there be evil after that goodness?” He said, “Yes, callers on the doors of Hellfire; whoever accepts their invitation to it they will throw into it.” I said, “O Messenger of Allah! Describe them to us.” He said, “They are from our own people, speaking our language.” I said, “O Messenger of Allah! What do you command me to do if this happens in my time?” He said, “Adhere to the Jama‘ah (main body or group) of Muslims and their Imam (leader).” I said, “What if there was not a main group for them or a leader? He said, “Then detach yourself from all these sects, even if you have to bite the root of a tree until death comes to you while you are in that state.”

It does seem to me that what occurred after the dismantling of the Ottoman Empire; the partitioning of the Muslim lands into nation-states and the creation of nationalities, and thus, nationalisms, can reasonably be compared to the period described in the above hadith in which there is no main body of Muslims unified under one imam, and that the nation-states themselves can possibly be regarded as sects.

The sects of nation-states give birth to sub-sects; opposition groups, extremist groups, separatist movements, and so on, whose interpretation and application of the religion are preoccupied with matters of a nationalistic nature, and fixated on issues of statism and cultural identity; as is the case with many of the Islamist organizations today.

Thinkers from the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, for instance, or from Jamaat Islami in Pakistan, in my opinion, tended to interpret the religion through the lens of the social and political circumstances in which they lived, and with a view to recruiting religious doctrine in support of their political aims; rather than interpreting their circumstances through the lens of the religion, and rather than deriving their political aims from religious doctrine.  These thinkers, and their interpretations, have become the major point of reference for the Islamic groups to which they belonged, and that is a quality of a sect.  To some extent, this is an inevitable pattern for any group; its ideologues and intellectuals become the group’s religious authorities, its jurists, its mufassireen, even if they are not qualified for these roles, and even if their opinions on certain matters differed significantly from the historical scholarly consensus.  As a result of this pattern, the knowledge and understanding of the group’s members become insular, and, to one degree or another, distorted.  Again, this is a sect-like phenomenon.

What is most likely is that when we talk about a “main body” of Muslims, we are not talking about a literal group, but about a consensus of belief and interpretation which adheres to the established consensus and interpretation of the previous generations.  In this case, our Prophet ﷺ told us to adhere to the Jama’ah, which is like his advice in the absence of a Jama’ah, because it means distancing ourselves from sects.  If there is no Jama’ah (meaning if there is no longer any considerable representation of the established beliefs of Ahl us-Sunnah wal-Jama’ah), we are again told to avoid all of the sects, and simply seclude ourselves.  In either case, our recourse is to abstain from joining any sects that may emerge, for they are “callers to the Gates of Hell”.

It should be stated here that being a “caller to the Gates of Hell” does not necessarily mean that they and their followers will be punished with eternal damnation.  It does not necessarily mean that they are apostates inviting others to apostasy; it simply means that their errors are so grave that they constitute major sins, because of which they will earn Allah’s Punishment

In terms of forecasting the future, this is informative because it tells us that the ultimate victory of Islam will not come at the hands of any of these sects; neither the nation-state sects nor the sub-sects that operate within them.  Rather, victory will come from adherence to the main body of the Muslims and to the established consensus of belief and interpretation.

فَهْم الحكومة الإسلامية                         Understanding Islamic government

الأحكام الأساسية للشريعة؛ أي القواعد التي يتم تعريفها بشكل واضح في القرآن والسنة، تعتبر قليلة العدد نسبيًا، والقواعد التي لا تتعلق على وجه التحديد بأمور العبادات، تعتبر أقل. ومعظم ما نشير إليه بالخطأ على أنه “الشريعة” هو في الواقع فقه؛ أي الأحكام المستمدة بالاجتهاد لتوضيح الأمور التي لم تكن محددة بوضوح في الشريعة الإسلامية. وهذا أمر من المهم مراعاته في أي نقاش حول الحكومة الإسلامية، لأنك حتمًا سيكون عليك أن تقرر أي مجتهد تحديدًا ستريد أن تكون حكومتك قائمة على اجتهاداته.  فبالنسبة للقضايا التي يدور حولها خلافات في الرأي، سيكون عليك أن تقرر الرأي الذي تريد حكومتك أن تتبناه، أو (وهذا أفضل) عدم التشريع للقضايا التي يدور حولها خلافات مسموح بها؛ وهناك الكثير والكثير من هذه القضايا.

أظن أن الكثير ممن يدعون إلى إقامة حكومة إسلامية هم في الواقع يدعون إلى الحكومة التي تلتزم تمامًا بتفسيراتهم الشخصية والخاصة بالدين، ولن يرضوا بالحكومة التي تُقصر نفسها على الأحكام الصريحة للشريعة.  فهم يريدون حكومة قادرة على فرض استنتاجاتها الخاصة على الاختلافات المسموح بها في الرأي، لا الحكومة التي تعترف وتتسامح فيم يتعلق بتلك الخلافات، وتُقصر نفسها على المتطلبات الأساسية. على سبيل المثال، ربما هم يريدون أن يتم غلق كل المحال والأعمال فور رفع الأذان، وربما يريدون النقاب أن يكون إلزاميًا، وربما يريدون تشريع بخصوص طول لحية الرجل أو مدى قصر سرواله ….، الخ، الخ.

كنت قد كتبت من قبل أن العديد من هؤلاء سيحشدون على الأرجح لثورة ضد المهدي لأنه لا يحكم بغير ما أنزل الله، لأنه، وبكل صراحة، الكثير منهم ليس لديه المعرفة الكافية لما يشكل وما لا يشكل الشريعة الآلهة.  فهم يتعاملون مع آراء العلماء الكبار مثل ابن تيمية أو ابن القيم رحمهم الله كما لو أنها وحي مُنَزَل، ويعتقدون أن الفتوى ملزمة قانونًا. ولا يدركون، كما قلت، أن متطلبات تشكيل حكومة لكي يتم تصنيفها قانونيًا على أنها “إسلامية” تعتبر قليلة جدًا، فما يقرب من 90٪ مما نسميه “شريعة” ما هو إلا رأي، فحتى شيء مثل إلزام غير المسلمين بدفع الجزية يعتبر غير مطلق، وفيه مجال للمرونة.

قدر كبير مما جعل المجتمع المسلم في الأجيال الأولى تقياً جدًا لم يكن له أي علاقة بالحكومة، ولكن كان له علاقة بالصلاح الفردي للناس؛ وهذا لم يتحقق من خلال التشريعات، فإذا كان الناس غير أتقياء، فلن تتمكن الحكومة من فرض التقوى عليهم.  وهذا الأمر أخشى أن العديد من المدافعين عن الحكومة الإسلامية لا يستوعبونه.

علينا أن نميز بين الحكومة التي تعتبر إسلامية من حيث التعريف القانوني، والحكومة التي تعتبر إسلامية من حيث الروح؛ أي الحكومة التي ستتعامل مع القضايا السياسة وفقا للمبادئ الإسلامية عندما لا تكون القضايا دينية بحتة.  لأنه، مرة أخرى كما كتبت عدة مرات، فإن العمل الرئيسي للحكومة يقع خارج نطاق الشريعة الصريحة. فالضرائب وتخصيص الميزانية، والتنمية الحضرية والريفية، وسياسة الطاقة، والسياسة التجارية، والسياسة النقدية، وإدارة الموارد، والنقل، والإسكان، والتوظيف…الخ، كل هذا الأشياء هي في الواقع ما تتعامل معه الحكومة أكثر من أي شيء آخر، والقرآن والسنة لن يخبرانا عن أين نبني خط أنابيب، أو كيف نحفز النمو الاقتصادي في الأحياء المحرومة، أو معدل الرسوم الجمركية المناسب، وما إلى ذلك، وبالتالي نحن في حاجة الى حكومة قادرة على التعامل مع هذه القضايا مسترشدةً بالقيم الإسلامية، بهدف تحقيق نتائج إيجابية للمجتمع.

 

تنويه: هذه النسخة منقحة ونهائية!

The fundamental provisions of the Shari’ah; the rules that are explicitly defined by the Qur’an and Sunnah; are relatively few.  Those rules which do not specifically relate to matters of worship are even fewer. Most of what we mistakenly refer to as “Shari’ah” is actually fiqh; rulings derived through ijtihad to clarify matters which were not explicitly defined by the Shari’ah.  This is important to consider in any discussion about Islamic government, because you are inevitably going to have to decide whose ijtihad you want your government to be based upon.  On issues about which there are differences of opinion, you are going to have to decide which opinion you want your government to adopt, or, and this is better, do not legislate on issues about which there are permissible disagreements; and there are many, many, of these issues.

I suspect that many of the people calling for Islamic government are in fact calling for a government which strictly adheres to their own personal interpretation of the religion, and they will not be satisfied with a government that restricts itself to the explicit rulings of the Shari’ah.  They want a government that will impose conclusions on permissible differences of opinion, not one that recognizes and tolerates those differences, and limits itself to the fundamental requirements.  For example, perhaps they want all businesses to close when the adhaan is called, perhaps they want niqab to be mandatory, perhaps they want to legislate how long a man’s beard must be or how short his trousers are, etc, etc.

I have written before that many of these people would probably call for revolution against the Mahdi for ruling by other than what Allah has revealed, because, quite frankly, many of them do not have sufficient knowledge regarding what does and does not constitute the Divine Shari’ah.  They treat the opinions of great scholars like Ibn Taymiyyah or Ibn al-Qayyim as if they are infallible revelation.   They believe that fatwas are legally binding.  They do not realize that, as I said, the requirements for a government to be legally categorized as “Islamic” are very few.  Roughly 90% of what we call “Shari’ah” is opinion; even something like obliging non-Muslims to pay Jizya is not absolute, but has room for flexibility.

A great deal of what made Muslim society in the early generations so pious had nothing to do with the government; it had to do with the individual righteousness of the people; it was not achieved through legislation.  If the people are impious, government cannot impose piety upon them.  And this is something which I fear many advocates of Islamic government do not comprehend.

We have to distinguish between government that is Islamic by legal definition, and government that is Islamic in spirit; government that will deal with policy issues in accordance with Islamic principles when the issues are not strictly religious matters.  Because, again, as I have written many times, the main work of government falls beyond the scope of the explicit Shari’ah. Taxation, budget allocation, urban and rural development, energy policy, trade policy, monetary policy, resource management, transportation, housing, employment, and so on; these are the types of things that the government actually deals with more than anything, and the Qur’an and Sunnah are not going to tell you where to build a pipeline, how to stimulate economic growth in deprived neighborhoods, what the rate of tariffs should be, etc, etc. So you need a government that will approach these issues guided by Islamic values, and with the aim of achieving positive outcomes for society.