Islamism

Turning Islam into an ideology

The 20th Century was the heyday for ideology. Marxism, Socialism, Communism, Nazism, Fascism, on and on.  The 20th Century also sent the Muslim world into a tailspin with the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire.
In some ways, you can kind of see a parallel between what happened intellectually in the Muslim world with what happened in Europe in terms of the shift away from traditional religious structures of thought and understanding to rationalistic ideology, because they basically lost their moral footing when they turned away from religon.  Something Fredich Nietzche predicted well before it happened, when he said “God is dead…we have killed Him…who will wipe the blood off us?”  What he meant, of course, was that men had killed their belief in God, renounced religious structures, and in so doing, had ventured into chaos.

For Europe, the turn away from religion made them turn to ideologies for something to believe in.  For the Muslims, the end of the Ottoman Empire left them scrambling for a way to re-energize themselves around a concept that could restore their power and sense of identity.  Extremism emerged both in the West and in the Muslim world in the form of radical belief in ideologies.  For Europe, these were rationalistic, while for the Muslim world, it was still religiously based, with the concept of Islamism or Political Islam.

Since Islam is a religion and not an ideology, turning it into an ideology was not an easy thing to do.  So what they did was to basically borrow elements of other ideologies.  While there were a variety of trends, generally aligning with one or another European ideological trend, Islamism was essentially focused on building an ideology that was state-centric.  This isn’t surprising, since the whole movement developed as a response to the collapse of the Ottoman state.

As Islamism was developing, in the Arab world, there was also the emergence of another ideology, that of Pan-Arabism, or Arab nationalism; which, in fact, was already brewing prior to the dismantling of the Ottoman Empire, and played a role in its collapse.  This then saw the Baathist ideology form, and spread in the Arab world.  It was a kind of mix between Fascist and Socialist, Totalitarian dogmas, and Islamism was quite influenced by this.  In fact, it is more or less the same, politically, but with the religious element blended in.

So what sort of religious element would work here?  Well, it makes sense that it would be an interpretation that emphasizes a strict view on the rules and regulations of the religion, I think.  It should be an interpretation that creates a necessity of enforcement of those rules by the state.  And this is predictably going to mean exaggerating the status of what may just be recommendations into the status of obligatory legislation, and it is going to mean denying the existence of divergent opinions on a single issue.  It should also be an interpretation that emphasizes a divisive group identity and a method of proving group identity through superficial, observable adherence to the rules being mandated.

This is the only viable religious interpretation that can be used to support a state-centric ideology, and to a certain extent, that is exactly what happened with Wahhabism in Saudi Arabia when the modern state was founded.

Now, I should say, of course, that this is not to in any way lessen the centrality and importance of the Shari’ah in Islam.  But the fact of the matter is that the Qur’an, as explained by some of the most eminent scholars of Islam, only contains about 500 verses that provide explicit legislation, explicit meaning, they are not open to interpretation, they are clear-cut rulings; and most of these pertain to acts of worship, not to governance or the penal system and so forth.  That is out of a total number of verses over 6000. So the actual explicit rulings in the Qur’an are relatively few.  The same sort of ratio exists in the Hadiths; the overwhelming majority of Hadiths do not contain explicit legislation.  What has happened is that the line between what is an explicit ruling and what is an interpreted ruling derived from non-explicit verses and Hadiths has become blurred.  That is, the line between the Law itself and jurisprudence, or Fiqh, has been blurred.  And this means the line between what is Revelation and what is opinion has become obscured.

Furthermore, the methodologies for deducing jurisprudential rulings have decreased.  We have started to take a very cut-and-dried approach to jurisprudence, we over-simplify, we discard nuances, we fail to consider circumstantial factors, environmental and historical factors, and so on.  And it is necessary to do that when you are creating an ideology.  You have to over-simplify.  You have to reduce complexity.  You have to create a black and white perspective and eject as many alternate views as possible.

So we have this idea today that because the early generations of Islam are the best generations, we have to do what they did, we have to imitate their actions; rather than saying that we should engage in the same intellectual processes that they did to determine what our actions should be; because those processes are complicated, and because those processes may very well result in a multiplicity of opinions about what we should do.  That approach does not lend itself to the uniformity and cohesion required by an ideology.

An ideology must be able to manifest itself into a system; you have to be able to tick the boxes, with the belief that once all the boxes are ticked, you will have established a Utopia.

But here is the thing:  there is no such thing as an Islamic System.  This term does not appear in the entirety of the Qur’an or Hadith literature.  But, you know, Marxists have a system, Communists have a system, Fascists have a system, Baathists have a system, so we have to have a system…if we are going to have an ideology.

What the Qur’an is, and what the Sunnah is, and what they say they are, is Guidance; not a system.  That is because Islam is a religion, not an ideology; and when you reduce it to an ideology, you make it dysfunctional.  You turn it into a man-made construct, and not Divine Guidance.  We always like to say that Islam provides a prescription for an ideal society; as the Islamist slogan says “Islam is the solution”.  But that is not what the Book says, that is not what the Prophet said.  And if Islam really did claim to provide a panacea for each and every human problem that has ever and will ever occur, and if it claimed that it lays out the blueprint for a Utopian society; that would be proof positive that it did not come from the Creator.

I know for Muslims, this sounds strange.  We are fond of likening the Qur’an to an instruction manual for life.  We say that Allah has provided us with a rule book for how to live our lives, how to deal with any and every difficulty and challenge; and that it is the very comprehensiveness of Islam that proves it has a Divine Origin; because who else could have come up with such a system other than God?  But the truth is that our Creator Knows better than we do how complex we are, how complicated our nature is, how much our circumstances and situations change, and that any sort of comprehensive set of instructions are inevitably going to become obsolete in a very short span of time.  That is why what we get from the Qur’an and Sunnah is Guidance that can be adapted as we and our circumstances change.  That is why Islam does NOT provide a list of boxes to tick to create a Utopian society, because our Creator Knows that the nature of the Creation He produced and the nature of the creatures in it are such that there is no such thing as an earthly Utopia.

The proof of the Divine Origin of Islam is that it does NOT present a formula, a plan, a system for creating an idyllic society, because only a human being would imagine that such a society could be created.  Islam provides Guidance and Wisdom that can adapt to circumstances and that can inform us about our nature to help us navigate through life in ways that will hopefully make our lives more successful and our selves more virtuous, and most importantly (as it IS a religion) improve our relationship with the Creator and make us successful in the Afterlife.

Even though Islamism is awash with religious rhetoric and references to Allah, really, it functions as a secular neo-fascist ideology, almost exclusively concerned with material issues and explanations of worldly matters, and it has very little to do with worship or spirituality.  Allah has become the rhetorical figurehead of a conceptual state in the Islamists’ minds almost like the mythologized image of Joseph Stalin in Soviet Russia, whom everyone wants to please and associate themselves with through their strictness and expertise in the ideology.  Islamists have kind of become the clergy Islam never had, and isn’t supposed to have; the priest class who are the arbiters and enforcers of an ideology that is primarily interested in power and control.  And again, that is one of the things that happns when you turn religion into ideology; you create a class of experts and authorities who have no real qualification outside of the niche they have created for themselves. That is what happens with any ideology I suppose; you have a group of intellectual interpreters of the ideology, and they become authorities; and they are people who could never attain authority in any other scenario.

Advertisements

Nouman Ali Khan and Islamist Reductivism             نعمان علي خان واختزالات الإسلاموية

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

As soon as the story broke about Nouman Ali Khan’s interactions with female staff, colleagues and students, we began to see people posting slightly panicked messages, apparently to all of us, essentially telling us that it is a mistake to idolize public figures and that our faith should not be shaken because one preacher falls short of the image we had of him.  There are a lot of problems with this response.  The most obvious problem with it is that it massively overestimates the importance of these Muslim public figures in the lives of the Ummah.  As if screenshots of an intimate chat between an ustadh and a woman he is courting might deal a body blow to our belief in Islam the way the death of the Prophet did or something.  This inflated view of the importance of these teachers reveals a lot.

By saying “don’t idolize them” when one of them falls from what they presume is their pedestal, what they are actually doing is trying to stabilize their own pedestals.  Because if one of them falls, they are not actually afraid that we will lose faith in Islam (that is absurd), but that we will lose faith in them as arbiters of what it means to be a good Muslim. They are afraid of a domino effect.

But here is the thing:  by insisting that Nouman Ali Khan be ejected from his pedestal for not conforming 100% to what we have come to define as a good Muslim, they are reinforcing the idolization of teachers like him.  They are reinforcing the idea that no one can be qualified to speak about Islam unless he or she is sinless and perfect.  They are reinforcing the idea that normal human frailties, faults, and weaknesses are equivalent to Nifaq.  Nouman Ali Khan always had a lot of interesting and useful things to say about the Qur’an, and he still does.  Nothing that has transpired has changed that.  What has to change is this un-Islamic notion that committing transgressions disqualifies you from teaching the knowledge you have, and from contributing to the overall understanding and development of the Ummah.  You cannot, in the same breath, say that we should not idolize teachers and also that Nouman Ali Khan should be shunned for not living up to the idolized image we supposedly had of him.  You can’t shove someone out of the pantheon of Islamic celebrity teachers and simultaneously claim that there should be no pantheon; no, you are trying to preserve it by casting him out.  If anything, this reaction seems more to justify their own expulsion from the pantheon, because this does not at all reflect genuine Islamic principles on the compassionate treatment of sin and error.

But, you see, this is symptomatic of what Islamism has done to the religion.  It has reduced it to a set of boxes to tick off; and in so doing, it has removed from Islam the capacity to deal with human complexity, which is something the religion does better than anything else.  The ideology of Islam, as opposed to the religion of Islam, leads people to equate superficial adherence to observable practices with internal qualities, such that if one ticks all the boxes, then that means they are a sinless, righteous person.  If he has a beard; he is devout.  If she wears hijab or niqab; she is righteous.  If he or she memorized the Qur’an; they are good, decent, pious people.  But none of these things mean those things.  If you have a beard, it means you have a beard.  If you wear hijab, it means you wear hijab.  That’s all; no more no less.

And if you insist on taking religious instruction exclusively from people who are free of human complexity, who do not sometimes fail in their moral struggles, who have no personal, psychological or emotional issues; who, in other words, bear no resemblance to you or to any other human being on earth because of their absolute piety, then I would really like to know who you are going to learn from; and if you DO find someone like that, I shudder to think what it is you will learn.

Long before Carl Jung theorized about the “Shadow” or the “dark side” of the human psyche, we understood the animal qualities of the Nafs, and we knew about the ongoing struggle in which we are all engaged against those darker elements of our beings.  We learned that the best people are not sinless, but that the best are those who repent and seek forgiveness when they inevitably do sin.  And we learned that sin and wrongdoing are more than anything else, forms of self-oppression.  The very language of Islam regarding sin and transgression manifests compassion, empathy, and promotes rehabilitation not condemnation.

But ideology cannot tolerate aberrations.  It must be judgmental, strict, harsh, and absolutist. And this has infected our own personal practice and understanding of Islam.  It has made us very hard on one another, and this harshness with others unavoidably makes us hypocritical, because, of course, we are each guilty of sin and wrongdoing in our own private lives, and very often, we are guilty of exactly the same errors for which we condemn others.  And in doing so, we commit a wrong even greater than the wrong we are condemning.  This is just part of how reducing Islam from a religion to an ideology reduces us in the process, demeans us, and instead of making us better people, makes us worse.

بمجرد أن اندلعت قصة الرسائل التي تبادلها الداعية نعمان علي خان مع بعض الموظفات والزميلات والطالبات، بدأنا نرى رسائل مضطربة قليلا تصدر من البعض، وعلى ما يبدو فإنها تخبرنا جميعا وبشكل أساسي أنه من الخطأ أن نؤله الشخصيات العامة وأن لا ينبغي أن يهتز إيماننا لمجرد أن أحد الدعاة انحرف عن الصورة التي رسمناها له. هناك الكثير من المشاكل مع رد الفعل هذا، والمشكلة الأكثر وضوحا هي أنها تبالغ في تقدير أهمية الشخصيات العامة الإسلامية في حياة الأمة. وكأن بضعة لقطات من دردشة حميمة بين أستاذ وامرأة يغازلها ستسدد ضربة قاضية لإيماننا بالإسلام أشبه ما يكون بحادث موت النبي صلى الله عليه وسلم مثلا… هذه النظرة المتضخمة لأهمية هؤلاء الدعاة تكشف عن الكثير.

كلمة “لا تؤلهوهم” نفسها التي نقولها عندما يسقط أحد منهم من على منبره، كأنها في الواقع محاولة لجعلهم مستقرين على هذا المنبر، لأنه عندما يسقط أحدهم، فالناس لا يخافون حقا من فقداننا لإيماننا بالإسلام (فهذا أمر سخيف)، ولكنهم يخافون أن نفقد الثقة بهم كمثال لما يعنيه المسلم الحق… باختصار هم يخافون من تأثير الدومينو.

ولكن إليكم هذه النقطة: بإصرارهم على طرد نعمان علي خان من منبره لعدم مطابقته 100٪ مع ما يرون أنه تعريف المسلم الحق، فهم يعززون “تأليه” كل الشيوخ مثله، ويعززون فكرة أنه لا يمكن لأحد أن يكون مؤهلا للتحدث عن الإسلام ما لم يكن مثالي وبلا خطيئة، ويعززون الفكرة القائلة بأن أوجه القصور والعيوب ونقاط الضعف البشرية العادية مثلها مثل النفاق. لقد كان لنعمان علي خان الكثير من الأشياء المثيرة والمفيدة ليقولها عن القرآن، ولا زال يفعل، ولم يطرأ أي تغيير على ذلك. ما يجب أن يتغير هو هذه الفكرة غير الإسلامية التي ترى أن ارتكاب التجاوزات ستستبعدك من نقل معرفتك للآخرين، ومن المساهمة في الفهم العام وتنمية الأمة. لا يمكنك، أن تقول في نفس العبارة أننا لا يجب أن نؤله أساتذتنا وشيوخنا، وأنه يجب أن تتم مقاطعة نعمان علي خان لأنه لم يرق إلى الصورة النمطية التي كان من المفترض أن يكون عليها. لا يمكنك أن تقذف شخص ما من فوق معبد تأليه الشيوخ المشاهير ثم تدعي في الوقت نفسه أنه لا ينبغي أن يكون هناك معبدا للتأليه! أنت بهذا تحاول أن تحافظ على معبد التأليه عن طريق إبعاد هذا أو ذاك عنه. أن كنا نريد أن نصف رد الفعل هذا بشيء، فهو يبرر طردهم هم أنفسهم من مثل هذا المعبد، لأنه لا يعكس على الإطلاق المبادئ الإسلامية الحقيقية على المعاملة الرحيمة للخطيئة والزلل.

ولكن، كما ترى، هذه هي أعراض ما فعلته الإسلاموية للدين، فقد اختزلته في قائمة من النقاط التي يتم وضع علامات بجوارها؛ وبذلك، فقد أزالت من الإسلام القدرة على التعامل مع التعقيد البشري، وهو شيء يفعله الدين أفضل من أي شيء آخر. فالأيديولوجيه الإسلاموية، عكس الدين الإسلامي نفسه، تجعل الناس يساوون بين التمسك السطحي بالممارسات المرئية وبين الصفات الداخلية، بحيث إذا وضع أحدهم علامة بجوار كل نقطة، فهذا يعني أنه شخص خير وبلا خطيئة: فإن كان بلحية، فهو متدين. وإن كانت ترتدي الحجاب أو النقاب، فهي صالحة. وإذا حفظ أو حفظت القرآن، فهو طيب، وتقي وعلى خلق. ولكن هذا لا يعني ذاك في الحقيقة!! فإذا كان لديك لحية، فهذا يعني أن لديك لحية. وإن كانت ترتدي الحجاب، فهذا يعني أنها ترتدي الحجاب. وهذا كل شئ؛ لا أكثر ولا أقل.

إن كنت تصر على أخذ تعاليم الدين حصريا من أشخاص خالين من التعقيد البشري، ولا يفشلون أحيانا في جهادهم الأخلاقي، وليس لديهم قضايا شخصية أو نفسية أو عاطفية؛ أو بعبارة أخرى، لا يحملون أي تشابه بك أو بأي إنسان آخر على الأرض بسبب التقوى المطلقة، دعني أعرف إذا ممن ستتعلم!!؟؟ وإن وجدت هذا الشخص، فأنا أرتعد وأنا أفكر ما قد تتعلمه منه.

قبل أن يقوم كارل يونج بالتنظير لقضية “الظل” أو “الجانب المظلم” من النفس البشرية بفترة طويل، كنا نحن نعرف الكثير عن الصفات الحيوانية للنفس، وكنا نعرف عن الصراع المستمر الذي ننخرط فيه كلنا ضد هذه الجوانب السوداء من ذواتنا، وعلمنا أن أفضل الناس ليسوا بلا خطيئة، ولكن الأفضل هم من يتوبون ويستغفرون عندما يخطئون. وعلمنا أن الخطيئة والمخالفة هي شكل من أشكال الكبت النفسي أكثر من أي شيء آخر. فلغة الإسلام ذاتها عن الخطيئة والعدوان تجسد الرحمة والتعاطف، وتعزز إعادة التأهيل وليس الإدانة.

ولكن الإيديولوجيات لا يمكن أن تتسامح مع الانحرافات، فهي تصدر الأحكام بصرامة، وقسوة وبشكل مطلق. وهذا هو ما أصاب ممارستنا الشخصية وفهمنا للإسلام. وجعلنا نصعب الأمور جدا على بعضنا البعض، وهذه القسوة مع الآخرين لا مفر منها تجعلنا منافقين، لأننا، بالطبع، جميعا نرتكب الذنوب والزلل في حياتنا الخاصة، وكثيرا ما نكون مذنبون بنفس الأخطاء التي ندين بها الآخرين. وعندما نفعل هذا فنحن نرتكب خطأ أكبر من الخطأ الذي ندينه. هذه مجرد لمحة من كيف اختزلنا الإسلام وحولناه من دين إلى أيديولوجية وفي أثناء هذه العملية، قللنا من أنفسنا … وبدلا من أن نجعل من أنفسنا أناس أفضل، جعلنا أنفسنا أسوأ.

A critical approach –   تناول نقدي

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

There is no advanced field of study that can dispense with its earliest, pioneering scholars.  And it may well be true that latter-day scholars pale in comparison to their forbearers whose intellectual achievements laid the groundwork for everything that followed.  Isaac Newton will never be superfluous to Physics, for example; nor Sigmund Freud to psychoanalysis.  And in the area of Islamic knowledge, we can never dismiss giants like Imam Ahmad, Imam Shafi’I, Abu Hanifah, Ibn Taymiyyah, and so on.  But the understanding of Physics did not end with Isaac Newton; and nor should the development of our understanding of religion be constrained by our reverence for the early scholars.

Subsequent scholars have pointed out several flaws in Newton’s theories.  300 years after Isaac Newton wrote about the Laws of Gravity, a 23-year-old Physics student discovered an error in his calculations that no one had ever noticed before.  But, as the student himself says, “it certainly doesn’t change history’s view of Newton”.  The Psychology community today largely views Freud’s theories as fundamentally wrong, but still recognises the value of his foundational work on pathology.  In both of these cases, the most eminent figures in their respective fields of study suffer from what is inevitable for anyone whose mind is bound by time and space; their work is dated.

Over the course of decades, to say nothing of centuries, it is not merely that information and thoughts change, but thought processes change as well.  This applies on the micro level in our own lives.  When you are young and inexperienced, you make decisions and hold opinions that seem perfectly rational and well-reasoned at the time, but later in life, when you revisit those choices and ideas, you see the mistakes you made because your life experience enables you to see factors and dynamics you were incapable of considering at the time.  You formed opinions based on who you were then, what you knew, and what circumstances formed the context of your choices.  Furthermore, all of these factors influenced your thinking process, because, for example, who you are at 18 is very different from who you are at 40 or 50.  You have different priorities, different goals, and even different values over time.  At one point, you may make decisions based exclusively on idealistic principles, while developing your moral character; at another point, your thought process may be more driven by material concerns as you try to provide for a family, and so on.

Consider the experience of re-reading a favorite book from your youth years later that had a major impact on you the first time you read it.  Most likely, you react very differently to it upon second review.

I would argue that this same dynamic occurs on a larger scale; it happens to societies.  It happens, indeed, to the human race.

Our great early scholars lived in a particular era, in particular circumstances, and they did not exist in a vacuum.  Their approaches to the interpretation of the religion, their thought processes in extrapolating rulings in Fiqh from Shari’ah evidences, were unavoidably subject to the influences of their time and place and society.  I highly doubt that any single one of them would have claimed that their work would, or should, abide without update until the end of time, equivalent to the Divine source material.  And I doubt that any single one of them would have suggested that their conclusions should not be questioned or challenged simply on the basis of them being “Great Men”.

But this is what happens frequently today in this Ummah.  We know that we cannot attribute infallibility to the early scholars without this being Shirk, but in practical terms, we treat them as if they were because we take it by default that we are inherently more fallible than they were, and thus, we are not qualified to question or challenge their conclusions.  The result of this is that their conclusions must be accepted as if they are infallible.  And that is a massive mistake.

This is not to say, of course, that anyone and everyone can engage in Tafsir or Fiqh with equal legitimacy to genuinely brilliant scholars of the past.  And, again, it does not mean that those scholars can be discarded in any way.  But we have every right to approach their conclusions critically, and yes, we do have the right to either take or leave their rulings in accordance with what we determine to be correct; and we are required to allow others to do the same.  The one who follows a scholar’s opinion does not have a higher rank in righteousness than the one who does not, and vice versa.  If there is no compulsion in religion, which is from Allah, there is even less validity for compulsion in Fiqh, which is from human beings.  If you recognise the reality that a scholar may be right or wrong in his ruling, than you can also be right or wrong in either following his ruling or not following it; and the one who chooses to do either one is equal to the one who chooses to the opposite.  And this, it seems to me, underpins the existence of any sense of brotherhood between us.

I will give something of an example to elucidate how an individual’s thought process informs the way they interpret religious texts, and why it is useful, or can be, to approach these matters critically.  In this case, I am not talking about an early scholar, but an actual Companion who, in my view, misconstrued the implications of a statement by the Prophet ﷺ.  And, of course, there are many such instances of this among the Sahabah.

There is a well-known story about Abu Dharr al-Ghifari in which he was told, and insistently rejected as a possibility, that his house had burnt down.  He considered it impossible that this had occurred because he had recited a du’aa that morning which he learned from Rasulullah ﷺ, that guaranteed protection from any sort of harm.

As it turned out, Abu Dharr was right; his house was intact.  But we can argue that his thinking process was flawed.  His house might very well have burnt down, and the protection of the du’aa would have still been true, because, of course, “You may hate a thing while it is actually good for you”.  Had Abu Dharr found his home destroyed, because of the du’aa, he would have understood that the destruction of his house did not constitute harm and that it was something that would ultimately prove beneficial to him; and it seems to me, this would have been a better response to the news.  Rather than rejecting the possibility that the house was burnt down, he could have reacted stoically with the consoling knowledge that the event, despite appearances, was not in fact harmful for him because the du’aa precluded the possibility of harm occurring.   And, as we know, even calamities are good for the Believer.  The du’aa does not, as I see it, prevent things from happening which you might consider harmful, what it prevents is you considering them to be so, and this empowers you to handle anything that happens with an attitude more congruent with Imaan.

Now, you can imagine what might happen if someone actually took Abu Dharr’s understanding of the hadith uncritically.  He or she would imagine that reciting this du’aa every morning would literally prevent anything they deemed harmful from happening, without considering the possibility that their evaluation of the thing might be faulty.  So when something they deem harmful does happen, what then?  They would be left with no other conclusion than that the du’aa doesn’t work, and that either the hadith is inauthentic, or that the Prophet ﷺ was wrong.

This is what happens when we fail to differentiate between what is Divinely revealed and what is humanly deduced; and that is exceedingly dangerous.

لا يوجد هناك أي مجال متقدم من الدراسة يمكنه أن يستغني عن علمائه المتقدمين والأوائل. وقد يكون صحيحا لو قلنا أن علماء العصر الحالي يتوارون خجلا مقارنة بسابقيهم ممن وضعت إنجازاتهم الفكرية الأسس لكل ما تلاه. إسحاق نيوتن لن يكون أبدا زائدا عن حاجة الفيزياء، على سبيل المثال؛ ولا سيغموند فرويد بالنسبة للتحليل النفسي. وفي مجال المعرفة الإسلامية، لا يمكننا أبدا أن نتغاضى عن فيض عمالقة مثل الإمام أحمد والإمام الشافعي وأبو حنيفة وابن تيمية وهلم جرا. ولكن فهم الفيزياء لم ينتهي مع إسحاق نيوتن، وبالتالي لا ينبغي أن “نكبل” تطوير فهمنا للدين لمجرد أننا نقدر علمائنا السابقين.

لقد أشار الكثير من العلماء اللاحقون إلى العديد من العيوب في نظريات نيوتن، فبعد 300 سنة من كتابة إسحاق نيوتن عن قوانين الجاذبية، اكتشف طالب فيزياء يبلغ من العمر 23 عاما خطأ في حساباته التي لم يلاحظها أحد من قبل. ولكن، كما يقول الطالب نفسه، “بالتأكيد هذا لا يغير وجهة نظر التاريخ من نيوتن”. مجتمع علم النفس اليوم إلى حد كبير يرى نظريات فرويد على أنها خاطئة بشكل أساسي، ولكنه لا يزال يعترف بقيمة عمله الأساسي عن علم الأمراض. في كلتا الحالتين، فإن الشخصيات الأكثر بروزا في مجالات العلم ستعاني من حتمية ارتباط عقولنا بالزمان والمكان… فكل جهدهم سيصبح قديما بمرور الزمن.

ومع مرور العقود، بل والقرون، نجد أن المعلومات والأفكار لا تتغير فقط، بل أن العمليات نفسها تتغير، وهذا ينطبق على المستوى الجزئي في حياتنا. فعندما نكون صغارا ومعدومي الخبرة، فنحن نتخذ قرارات ونتبني آراء قد تبدو عقلانية تماما ومعللة جدا في وقتها، ولكن في وقت لاحق في الحياة، وعند إعادة النظر إلى هذه الخيارات والأفكار، سنرى بوضوح الأخطاء التي ارتكبناها لأن حياتنا أصبحت مثل التجربة التي ألقت لنا الضوء على العوامل والديناميات التي لم نكن قادرين على رؤيتها في ذلك الوقت. فقد شكلنا هذه الآراء على أساس من كنا وما كنا نعرفه، كما أن الظروف نفسها شكلت سياق اختياراتنا. علاوة على ذلك، فكل هذه العوامل أثرت على عملتنا الفكرية. فأنت، على سبيل المثال، لو كنت في الـ18 من عمرك ستختلف كثيرا عمن أنت في الـ40 أو 50. ستكون لديك أولويات مختلفة، وأهداف مختلفة، وحتى قيم مختلفة على مر الزمن. ففي مرحلة ما، قد تتخذ قرارات تستند حصريا على مبادئ مثالية، في حين أن طابعك الأخلاقي لم يتطور بعد. وفي نقطة أخرى، قد تكون عملية تفكيرك مدفوعة أكثر بالمخاوف المادية وأنت تحاول أن توفر الرزق لأسرتك، وهلم جرا.

انظر مثلا في تجربة إعادة قراءة كتابك المفضل من سنوات الشباب بعد أن كان له تأثير كبير عليك في المرة الأولى التي قرأته فيها! على الأرجح، ستتفاعل معه بشكل مختلف جدا في المرة الثانية.

ما أود أن أقوله هو أن هذه الديناميكية تحدث على نطاق أوسع؛ فهي تحدث للمجتمعات، بل أنها في الواقع، تحدث للجنس البشري.

لقد عاش علماءنا المبكرون العظماء في عصر معين، وفي ظروف خاصة، وهم لم يكونون يعيشون في فراغ. فنهجهم في تفسير الدين، ومحاولاتهم الدءوبة لاستقراء أحكام الفقه من الأدلة الشرعية، كانت بلا شك متأثرة بزمانهم ومكانهم ومجتمعهم. وبلا شك لا يوجد منهم من ادعى أن عمله، ينبغي أن يلتزم به بدون أي تحديث حتى نهاية الزمن، متشبهين في ذلك بالوحي الإلهي. وأشك أن أي منهم قد اقترح أن استنتاجاته لا ينبغي التشكيك فيها أو الطعن فيها على أساس أنهم “رجال عظماء”.

ولكن هذا ما يحدث في كثير من الأحيان اليوم في هذه الأمة. ونحن نعلم أننا لا نستطيع أن نعزو العصمة إلى العلماء الأوائل دون أن يكون هذا الشرك، ولكن من الناحية العملية، نحن نعاملهم كما لو كانوا كذلك لأننا نعتبر افتراضيا أننا أكثر جهلا وضعفا منهم، وبالتالي، نحن لسنا مؤهلين لاستجواب أو تحدي استنتاجاتهم. والنتيجة هي أن استنتاجاتهم يجب أن تقبل كما لو كانوا معصومين. وهذا خطأ هائل.

وهذا لا يعني، طبعا أن كل الناس أو أي شخص يمكنه أن يقوم بالتفسير أو كتابة الفقه بشرعية متساوية مع علمائنا الأفذاذ من الماضي. ولكنه أيضا لا يعني أن هؤلاء العلماء يمكن الاستغناء عنهم بأي شكل من الأشكال. إلا أن لدينا كل الحق في التعامل مع استنتاجاتهم بشكل نقدي، ونعم، لدينا الحق في تبني أو ترك أحكامهم وفقا لما نقرر أنه صحيحا، ونحن مطالبون للسماح للآخرين بفعل الشيء نفسه. ومن يتبع رأي عالما ما ليست له مرتبة أعلى ممن لا يتبع عالما، والعكس بالعكس. فطالما أنه لا إكراه في الدين، رغم أنه دين الله، فهناك بالتأكيد صلاحية أقل للإكراه في الفقه، حيث أنه من البشر. فإذا كنت تعترف بحقيقة أن عالما قد يكون على صواب أو خطأ في حكمه، فأنت أيضا قد تكون على صواب أو خطأ في إتباع هذه الحكم أو عدم إتباعه؛ ومن يختار أن يفعل أي من هذا فهو يتساوى مع من يختار ألا يفعل. وهذا، كما يبدو لي، يدعم إحساس الأخوة بيننا.

وسأعطيكم مثالا لتوضيح كيف أن عملية التفكير لدى الفرد تلقي الضوء على الطريقة التي يفسر بها النصوص الدينية، والسبب في كون هذا مفيدا، أو أنه قد يكون مفيدا لتناول هذه المسائل بشكل نقدي. في هذه الحالة، أنا لا أتحدث عن عالم من العلماء الأوائل، ولكن عن صحابي جليل، أرى أنه أساء تفسير الآثار المترتبة على حديث صدر عن النبي ﷺ. وبطبيعة الحال، هناك العديد من هذه الحالات بين الصحابة.

هناك قصة مشهورة عن أبو ذر الغفاري الذي قيل له فيها أن منزله قد أحرق ولكنه رفض هذا الأمر بشكل قاطع. واعتبر أنه من المستحيل أن يحدث هذا لأنه قام بتلاوة دعاء تعلمه ذلك الصباح من رسول الله ﷺ، وهو يتضمن الحماية من أي نوع من الضرر.

ثم اتضح أن أبو ذر كان على حق، فقد ظل منزله سليما. إلا أننا يمكن أن نقول أن عملية تفكيره كانت معيبة. فقد كان من الممكن جدا أن يحترق منزله كله، ومع ذلك ستظل “حماية” الدعاء صحيحة، ببساطة لأننا “قد نكره شيئا وهو خير لنا أو نحب شيئا وهو شر لنا”. فلو وجد أبو ذر منزله قد أحرق، بالرغم من الدعاء، فلا شك أنه كان سيفهم أن تدمير منزله لا يشكل ضررا وقد يثبت في نهاية المطاف أنه كان أمر مفيدا له؛ ويبدو لي أن هذه كانت ستكون استجابة أفضل للأخبار. فبدلا من رفض احتمال إحراق المنزل، كان بإمكانه أن يتفاعل بشكل ثابت مع اليقين بأن الحدث، على الرغم من مظهره، لم يكن ليضره لأن الدعاء سيحول دون احتمال وقوع ضرر. وكما نعلم، فحتى النكبات مفيدة للمؤمن. والدعاء كما أرى، لا يمنع حدوث الأمور التي قد نعتبرها ضارة، ولكنه يمنعنا نحن من أن نعتبر ما يحدث على أنه “ضرر”، وهذا يعطينا القدرة على التعامل مع أي شيء يحدث بشكل أكثر انسجاما مع الإيمان.

والآن، يمكنك أن تتخيل ما كان يمكن أن يحدث لو تناول أي شخص فهم أبو ذر للحديث بشكل غير نقدي، فسيتخيل (هو أو هي) أن قراءة الأذكار كل صباح من شأنها أن تمنع حرفيا أي شيء نعتبره من وجهة نظرنا ضارا، دون النظر في إمكانية أن يكون تقييمنا للشيء نفسه معيب وقاصر. فإن حدث ما نراه أو نحسبه “ضررا” كيف سيكون حلنا؟ لن يكون لنا أي استنتاج آخر غير أن الدعاء غير مجدي، وأن الحديث إما غير صحيح، أو أن النبي ﷺ كان مخطئا حاشاه.

هذا بالضبط ما يحدث عندما نفشل في التفريق بين الوحي الآلهي والاستنباط البشري، وهذا أمر خطير للغاية.

Towards a new Islamism             نحو إسلام سياسي جديد

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

Any political system, and any platform for a political party or movement, of course, is going to be a product of a belief system; and usually that is going to be a religious belief system.  The secularism of the West (and indeed, in Turkey), should not be construed as being “unreligious” at its foundation.  It is a secularism that emerged as a reaction to the tyranny of the church, or of the religious scholars; but religion permeates their political philosophies.  How could it not?

Angela Merkel, after all, heads the Christian Democratic Party of Germany.  In America, it is possible to elect a Black president, a woman president, a Jewish president, and so on; but an atheist does not stand a chance.

I consider myself an Islamist; I believe in Political Islam; but I find myself at odds with what can be called “mainstream Islamism”, because, frankly, I think it is a scam. As a Muslim, it makes sense that my religion would shape my political views, my vision of how governments should behave; just as anyone else forms their political views based on their overall belief system.  I don’t see why that should be controversial, or why it should feel threatening to anyone, or why my political views should be dismissed out of hand simply because I have reached them through a belief system different from non-Muslims.

You can argue that Islamic texts do not support ideals like equality, freedom, leniency, and so on; just as I could argue the same about Christian texts.  But what is the point?  Those ideals are what I take from my texts, and they are what you take from yours.  I don’t really care how you reached these ideals, nor should you care how I reached them; they are shared ideals.

Political Islam, for me, means government that manifests the values and principles of my religion and cares about promoting those values in the society I live in through the practical implementation of laws, policies, and regulations; which, if we are honest, is exactly what non-Muslims want from their governments. What Political Islam does NOT mean for me, is an archaic system of government that replicates the model implemented 1,400 years ago, nor the model of the Muslim imperial era.  As I have stated innumerable times, there is no mandated governmental system in Islam; there are a handful of rules that apply to societal matters, and any government that implements them, or is even committed to pursuing the aims of those rules, is acceptable.

We have a history from which we can draw tremendous guidance for understanding how the state should behave, how government should be conducted and structured, and how the economy should be managed for the overall benefit of the society.  Of course, in our history, there are also plentiful examples of tyranny and oppression.  When we make reference to our history we learn from what we did right and from what we did wrong; and I don’t think that is peculiar to the Muslims.

The mainstream Islamists, however, are in my opinion, political hacks using religion to carve out a niche for themselves in the political landscape which they could never otherwise attain because of their profound ignorance and incompetence.  They spout empty and divisive rhetoric that alienates Muslim intellectuals, and non-Muslims alike, and they inadvertently present the best possible argument in favor of secularism, because, well, may Allah save us from these people ever wielding power.

Genuine Political Islam has every right to have a place in the political spectrum, and there is no reason why it should not garner the support of non-Muslims as well as Muslims; but it falls upon us to define and articulate it, and indeed, to develop it conceptually, in a way that makes it more than slogans and reactionary identity politics.

أي نظام سياسي، وأي برنامج لأي حزب أو حركة سياسية، سيكون بطبيعة الحال نتاج مجموعة من المعتقدات، التي عادة تكون دينية. ولا ينبغي أن نفسر علمانية الغرب (وبكل تأكيد علمانية تركيا) على أنها “غير دينية” في أساسها، فهي علمانية برزت كرد فعل على طغيان الكنيسة، أو علماء الدين، وبالتالي فإن الدين يتخلل فلسفاتهم السياسية. ولكن كيف يكون هذا؟

فكما نرى، أنجيلا ميركل ترأس الحزب الديمقراطي المسيحي في ألمانيا. وفي أمريكا، من الممكن انتخاب رئيس أسود، أو امرأة، أو رئيس يهودي، وهلم جرا؛ ولكن الملحد لن تكون له أية فرصة.

أنا أعتبر نفسي إسلاميًا، وأعتقد في الإسلام السياسي، إلا أنني أجد نفسي على خلاف مع ما يمكن أن نطلق عليه “التيار الإسلامي الرئيسي”، لأنني بصراحة، أجد فيه الكثير من الاحتيال. كمسلم، من المنطقي أن يشكل ديني وجهات نظري السياسية، ورؤيتي لكيفية إدارة الحكومات، تماما كما يشكل أي شخص آخر آراءه السياسية على أساس مجموعة معتقداته العقدية العامة. ولا أرى سببًا يجعل هذا الأمر مثيرًا للجدل، أو سببًا يجعله يمثل أي تهديد لأي أحد، أو سببًا يجعل وجهات نظري السياسية يتم استبعادها لمجرد أنني توصلت إليها من خلال نظام عقائدي يختلف عن نظام غير المسلمين.

قد تقول أن النصوص الإسلامية لا تدعم مثل عليا مثل المساواة، والحرية، والتسامح، وما إلى ذلك؛ كما يمكنني أن أقول الشيء نفسه عن النصوص المسيحية، ولكن ما هو الهدف من كل هذا؟ هذه المثل العليا هي ما أتخذه من نصوصي، وهي ما تتخذه أنت من نصوصك، ولا يهمني حقًا كيف وصلت إلى هذه المثل العليا، ولا يجب أن تهتم أنت كيف وصلت إنا إليها؛ فهي مُثُل مشتركة.

إن الإسلام السياسي بالنسبة لي يعني الحكومة التي تجسد قيمي ومبادئي الدينية وتهتم بتعزيز هذه القيم في المجتمع الذي أعيش فيه من خلال التطبيق العملي للقوانين والسياسات والأنظمة؛ والتي، إن كنا صادقين، هي نفس ما يريده غير المسلمين من حكوماتهم. وما لا يعنيه الإسلام السياسي بالنسبة لي، هو أن يكون نظام قديم من الحكم يحاول أن يقلد نموذجًا انتهى قبل 1400 سنة، ولا هو يمثل نموذج العصر الإمبراطوري الإسلامي. وكما ذكرت مرات لا حصر لها، لا يوجد نظام حكومي منصوص عليه في الإسلام؛ هناك عدد من الأسس والتشريعات المتعلقة بالمسائل المجتمعية، وأي حكومة تنفذها، أو حتى تلتزم بالسعي إلى تحقيق هذه الأسس، ستكون مقبولة.

يوجد لدينا تاريخ عريق يمدنا بتوجيهات هائلة تعيننا على فهم كيفية إدارة الدول، وكيفية إدارة الحكومات وتنظيمها، وكيفية إدارة الاقتصاد لتحقيق المنفعة العامة للمجتمع، وبالطبع، في تاريخنا، هناك أيضا أمثلة وفيرة من الطغيان والاضطهاد. فعندما نشير إلى تاريخنا يجب أن نتعلم مما أصبنا ومما أخطأنا فيه؛ وأنا لا أعتقد أن هذا شيء غريب على المسلمين.

أما الإسلاميين في التيار الرئيسي اليوم فهم، في رأيي، محتالون يستخدمون الدين لرسم مكانة لأنفسهم في المشهد السياسي الذي لم يتمكنوا من تحقيقه بسبب جهلهم العميق وعدم كفاءتهم. فهم يبثون الخطاب الفارغ والخلاف الذي ينفر المثقفين المسلمين وغير المسلمين على حد سواء، ويقدمون عن غير قصد أفضل حجة ممكنة للعلمانية، وليحفظنا الله من مثل هؤلاء لو حازوا على السلطة في أي وقت.

إن الإسلام السياسي الحقيقي له كل الحق في أن يكون له مكان في الطيف السياسي، ولا يوجد سبب يمنعه من كسب دعم غير المسلمين والمسلمين، ولكن علينا أن نحدده ونوضحه، بل ونطوره من الناحية النظرية، بطريقة تجعله أكثر من مجرد شعارات وردود أفعال متعلقة بالهوية.

Gulf-subsidized Islamism

Like any social movement, in order for Political Islam to succeed, it will need to grow from the grassroots.  It will need to express and address not only the genuine concerns of the general public, but it will also have to reflect their understanding, interpretation, and their relationship with Islam.  Islamist leadership is going to have to learn to preach less and listen more.

But we have a problem.

 

Gulf money has created a class of career Islamists; people who make their living promoting a version of Islamism that suits the ideology and interests of rich Khaleeji shaykhs, even if it does not adhere to the views of the masses. We know from extensive polling data that the majority of Muslims support making Shari’ah the law of the land.  Most Muslims would like to see their governments become more Islamic. But at the same time, most Islamist parties are losing their appeal for the general public, who tend to view them as either too extreme or too obsequious. The Islamists are becoming increasingly disconnected from the people who should be their constituency; and I believe a major reason for that is that they no longer have to depend upon them for their financial survival.

 

Instead, Islamist organizations and individuals rely on the patronage of wealthy men from Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Kuwait, and the UAE. The GCC has become a giant ATM machine for them, and it is much easier and more lucrative to go to the Gulf for a handout that will be given in huge bundles of cash rather than to collect a few coins here and there from the generally impoverished Muslim community at large.  But this affects the entire discourse of Political Islam, and this discourse affects the extent to which the idea resonates with the Muslim community; or alienates them.

 

Political Islam is becoming a propaganda project rather than a social movement.  The vision of Islamism is being determined, not from the grassroots, but from palaces in the Gulf States. It is not a “peoples’ Islamsim”. It is an Islamism of elites.  And this is reflected in how impractical, utopian, narrow-minded and absolutist the discourse is becoming.  It reflects a vision of people who live in a bubble of relative privilege. It is anti-democratic, pro-capitalist, intolerant, and astoundingly uneducated about the real dynamics of geopolitics, economics, and international affairs in general. And, it is worth noting, it is a vision which is never applied to the Gulf States themselves.

 

To some extent, we can assume that Islamism’s Gulf sponsors are sincerely driven by ideology.  They genuinely believe in their interpretation of the religion, and really think that the Muslim masses are astray to one degree or another; so they use their wealth to try to purge us of our misunderstandings.  Most Muslims believe in following the approach of the first three generations of Islam; but most of us are not Najdi, “Wahhabi” or “Salafi” or whatever term you want to use for their puritanical, literalist interpretation of the Qur’an and Sunnah. Following the example of the Sahabah and the Salaf means different things to different people.  I am not criticizing the Salafi minhaj, but it is not the only acceptable minhaj.  It developed as a necessary reformist response to the particular circumstances at a particular time and place.  The “Najdi da’awah” did not gain much traction in the wider Muslim world for over 100 years; basically, not until the region’s oil wealth began to flow. For even most of my life, the Salafis were associated with the view that Muslims should not involve themselves in politics.  They were the people that focused on the length of someone’s beard and trousers, and they thought Sayid Qutb was a deviant.

 

Today most of the Islamic organizations in the world, from humanitarian relief to schools, from websites to satellite channels, depend on money from the Arabian Gulf.  And, yes, Islamist parties from across the spectrum, from the Ikhwan to the jihadis, all turn to the GCC for considerable portions of their budget. And this trend of dependency has had an accompanying trend of intellectual ossification, if not outright petrification.

 

One would be forgiven for suspecting that the Khaleej decided to begin funding Islamism in order to control and undermine it.  Whatever the case may be, the Gulf is in a position to dominate the discourse of Political Islam today, and unless we begin to build a grassroots popular Islamic movement, I fear that the entire Islamist project will become increasingly irrelevant to the lives of most Muslims.

 

 

 

The deterioration of Islamism


(to be published in Arabic for Arabi21)

The election of Donald Trump to the American presidency takes place within the context of a global trend towards Right-wing nationalism.  This trend takes place within the context of global discontent with a status quo that has been managed for decades by center-Left political parties.

In France, which will hold elections next year, Francois Hollande has a lower approval rating than George W. Bush at the nadir of his popularity.  The National Front (the anti-Europe, anti-immigrant, anti-Muslim, overtly racist far-Right party) is the most popular political party in France; it is expected to win at least 40% of the votes in the upcoming election, which will see Neo-Fascists take the government.

In Italy, there is to be a constitutional referendum on December 4th which most Italians view as a vote for or against the authority of Brussels.  Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has said that he will resign if the referendum’s proposal is rejected, and it will be rejected; thus Italy will be forced to hold elections. In all likelihood, this will result in a Right-wing coalition taking power.

The administration of Angela Merkel in Germany is also vulnerable, and will most likely fall next year, again, being replaced by a far-Right, nationalist government.

Left-wing parties are less able to harvest the fruits of popular discontent primarily because they are relentlessly attacked by the center-Left.  Bernie Sanders in the US was sabotaged by his own party, and the major European Left parties have been the prime opponents of Syriza in Greece and Podemos in Spain, and so on.

How will this shift to the Right impact the Musllims?

The obvious answer to this question is that it will make life considerably more difficult.  And, frankly, I expect that we are beginning a new era within our Ummah of, for lack of a better term, secularization.  Advocating Political Islam is going to become entirely too dangerous, and more and more people will feel it is wiser to compromise and capitulate with a power structure that will be increasingly vicious.

But the real blame for this, in my opinion, cannot be laid at the feet of the ultra-Right, but rather Islamists themselves are responsible.  Whether we are talking about the Muslim Brotherhood at one end of the spectrum, or Da’esh at the other end; the voices of Political Islam have miserably failed to offer a clear, constructive, and responsive program.  In the absence of any articulate policies and comprehensive plans, it is not realistic to expect people to stand up and face the very real risks involved with advocating Political Islam.

Da’esh as a territorial project is essentially over. They will continue to struggle through small scale terrorist attacks and setting up franchises around the world, no doubt, but this will only push more people away from the concepts they champion; quite simply because 1.) people will have to distance themselves from such ideas for their own safety, and 2.) because, at the end of the day, not only do terrorist attacks do nothing useful to advance the ideas advocated by the perpetrators, but they also do nothing helpful in terms of the real issues affecting people’s lives.

We are entering an era in which people will no longer tolerate empty slogans, but it is also an era in which people are entirely open to radical change.  This should be a marvelous opportunity for Islamism, but unfortunately, Islamism’s proponents have failed to do the serious intellectual work that would make it a viable alternative to either the status quo or to the ultra-Right wing.  Therefore, I expect, the relevance of the Islamist project will be diminished year after year, and our people will turn elsewhere for solutions.  We have no one to blame for this but ourselves.

 

عن اعتزال الفِرَق                                     On avoiding sects…

روي في الصحيحين وفي غيريهما عَن أَبِي إِدْرِيْس الْخَوْلَانِي أَنَّه سَمِع حُذَيْفَة يَقُوْل:

“كَان الْنَّاس يَسْأَلُوْن رَسُوْل الْلَّه-صَلَّى الْلَّه عَلَيْه وَسَلَّم- عَن الْخَيْر، وَكُنْت أَسْأَلُه عَن الْشَّر مَخَافَة أَن يُدْرِكَنِي، فَقُلْت: يَا رَسُوْل الْلَّه، إِنَّا كُنَّا فِي جَاهِلِيَّة وَشَر فَجَاءَنَا الْلَّه بِهَذَا الْخَيْر فَهَل بَعْد الْخَيْر شَر؟ قَال: نَعَم. فَقُلْت: فَهَل بَعْد هَذَا الْشَّر مِن خَيْر؟ قَال: نَعَم وَفِيْه دَخَن، قَال قُلْت: وَمَا دَخَنُه؟ قَال: قَوْم يَسْتَنُّون بِغَيْر سُنَّتِي وَّيَهْدُوْن بِغَيْر هَدْيِي تَعْرِف مِنْهُم وَتُنْكِر، فَقُلْت هَل بَعْد ذَلِك الْخَيْر مِن شَر؟ قَال: نَعَم فِتْنَة عَمْيَاء دُعَاة عَلَى أَبْوَاب جَهَنَّم، مَن أَجَابَهُم إِلَيْهَا قَذَفُوْه فِيْهَا. فَقُلْت: يَا رَسُوْل الْلَّه، صِفْهُم لَنَا، قَال: نَعَم، قَوْم مِن جِلْدَتِنَا وَيَتَكَلَّمُوْن بِأَلْسِنَتِنَا، فَقُلْت: يَا رَسُوْل الْلَّه، وَمَا تَأْمُرُنِي إِن أَدْرَكْت ذَلِك، قَال تَلْزَم جَمَاعَة الْمُسْلِمِيْن وَإِمَامَهُم قُلْت فَإِن لَم يَكُن لَهُم جَمَاعَة وَلَا إِمَام؟ قَال: فَاعْتَزِل تِلْك الْفِرَق كُلَّهَا، وَلَو أَن تَعَض عَلَى أَصْل الْشَّجَرَة حَتَّى يُدْرِكَك الْمَوْت وَأَنْت عَلَى ذَلِك”.

يبدو لي أن ما حدث بعد تفكك الدولة العثمانية؛ أي بعد تقسيم بلاد المسلمين إلى دول قومية وابتداع الجنسيات، وبالتالي القوميات، يمكن أن يُقَارن منطقيًا بالفترة الموضحة في الحديث أعلاه حيث لا يوجد كيان رئيس للمسلمين يوحدهم تحت إمارة إمام واحد، والدول القومية نفسها، في هذه الحالة، يمكن اعتبارها كفِرَق.

والفِرَق المتمثلة في الدول القومية تؤدي إلى ظهور فِرَق فرعية؛ مثل الجماعات المعارضة والجماعات المتطرفة، والحركات الانفصالية…الخ، وكل هذه الفِرَق في تفسيرها وتطبيقها للدين منشغلة بأمور قومية، وتركز اهتمامها على القضايا الدولانية والهوية الثقافية، كما هي حالة العديد من المنظمات الاسلامية اليوم.

أرى أن المفكرين من جماعة الإخوان المسلمين في مصر، على سبيل المثال، أو من الجماعة الإسلامية في باكستان، يميلون إلى تفسير الدين من خلال عدسة الظروف الاجتماعية والسياسية التي كانوا يعيشون فيها، وبهدف تجنيد العقيدة الدينية في دعم أهدافهم السياسية، بدلا من تفسير ظروفهم من خلال عدسة الدين، وبدلا من اشتقاق أهدافهم السياسية من العقيدة الدينية.  هؤلاء المفكرين، وتفسيراتهم، أصبحوا هم المرجعية التي تنتمي إليها الجماعات الإسلامية، مما يجعلهم أقرب لشكل الفِرَق.  إلى حد ما، هذا النمط لا مفر منه لأية مجموعة، فمنظريهم ومفكريهم يصبحون هم السلطة الدينية لهذه الجماعات، فهم فقهائها، ومفسريها، حتى إن لم يكونوا مؤهلين لهذه الأدوار، وحتى لو اختلفت رؤاهم لبعض الأمور بشكل كبير عن الإجماع التاريخي.  ونتيجة لهذا النمط، تنعزل معرفة وفهم أعضاء المجموعة، وبقدر أو بآخر، تصبح مشوهة.  مرة أخرى، هذه الظاهرة أقرب ما تكون لشكل الفِرَق.

في الغالب نحن عندما نتحدث عن “البنيان الرئيسي” للمسلمين، فنحن لا نتحدث عن مجموعة بشكل حرفي، بل عن توافق في العقيدة والتفسير يتمسك بالإجماع والتفسير المبنيين خلال الأجيال السابقة.  في هذه الحالة، فقد أخبرنا نبينا ﷺ أن نتمسك بالجماعة، وهي نفس نصيحته في ظل غياب الجماعة، لآننا بهذا نعزل أنفسنا عن الفِرَق.  فإذا لم تكن هناك جماعة (أي إن لم يكن هناك أي تمثيل فعلي للمعتقدات الراسخة لأهل السنة والجماعة)، فالمطلوب منا مرة أخرى هو تجنب كل الفِرَق، أي ببساطة عزل أنفسنا. وفي كلتا الحالتين، فخلاصنا يكون في الامتناع عن الانضمام إلى أي من الفِرَق التي قد تنشأ، لأنهم “دُعَاة عَلَى أَبْوَاب جَهَنَّم”.

يجب أن نذكر هنا أن تعبير “دُعَاة عَلَى أَبْوَاب جَهَنَّم” لا يعني بالضرورة أنهم وأتباعهم سيعاقبون بالخلود في جهنم، ولا يعني بالضرورة أنهم مرتدون يدعون الآخرين إلى الردة، ولكنه يعني ببساطة أن أخطائهم خطيرة بحيث أنها تشكل كبائر، وبهذا سيستحقون عقوبة الله.

من حيث التنبؤ بالمستقبل، فهذا الأمر مفيد لأنه يخبرنا أن النصر النهائي للإسلام لن يأتي على يد أي من هذه الفِرَق، لا من الفِرَق التي في شكل دول قومية ولا من الفِرَق الفرعية التي تعمل بداخلها. في المقابل، فإن النصر سيأتي من التمسك بالبنيان الرئيسي للمسلمين والتمسك بالتوافق الذي تم بنائه في العقيدة والتفسير.

In the Two Sahihs, and elsewhere,  it is reported on the authority of Abu Idris Al-Khawlany that he heard Hudhayfah ibn Al-Yaman say:“People used to ask the Messenger of Allah  about the good, but I used to ask him about the evil lest it should afflict me.

Once I said, “O Messenger of Allah! We were living in ignorance and evil, then Allah bestowed upon us this goodness (i.e. Islam), so will there be evil after this goodness?” He said, “Yes”. I said, “Will there be goodness after that evil?” He said, “Yes, but in it there will be Dakhan (blemish, impurity).” I said, “What will its Dakhan be?” He said, “A people following a way other than my way (Sunnah) and calling to a guidance other than my guidance; you will approve of some of their actions and disapprove of others.” I said, “Will there be evil after that goodness?” He said, “Yes, callers on the doors of Hellfire; whoever accepts their invitation to it they will throw into it.” I said, “O Messenger of Allah! Describe them to us.” He said, “They are from our own people, speaking our language.” I said, “O Messenger of Allah! What do you command me to do if this happens in my time?” He said, “Adhere to the Jama‘ah (main body or group) of Muslims and their Imam (leader).” I said, “What if there was not a main group for them or a leader? He said, “Then detach yourself from all these sects, even if you have to bite the root of a tree until death comes to you while you are in that state.”

It does seem to me that what occurred after the dismantling of the Ottoman Empire; the partitioning of the Muslim lands into nation-states and the creation of nationalities, and thus, nationalisms, can reasonably be compared to the period described in the above hadith in which there is no main body of Muslims unified under one imam, and that the nation-states themselves can possibly be regarded as sects.

The sects of nation-states give birth to sub-sects; opposition groups, extremist groups, separatist movements, and so on, whose interpretation and application of the religion are preoccupied with matters of a nationalistic nature, and fixated on issues of statism and cultural identity; as is the case with many of the Islamist organizations today.

Thinkers from the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, for instance, or from Jamaat Islami in Pakistan, in my opinion, tended to interpret the religion through the lens of the social and political circumstances in which they lived, and with a view to recruiting religious doctrine in support of their political aims; rather than interpreting their circumstances through the lens of the religion, and rather than deriving their political aims from religious doctrine.  These thinkers, and their interpretations, have become the major point of reference for the Islamic groups to which they belonged, and that is a quality of a sect.  To some extent, this is an inevitable pattern for any group; its ideologues and intellectuals become the group’s religious authorities, its jurists, its mufassireen, even if they are not qualified for these roles, and even if their opinions on certain matters differed significantly from the historical scholarly consensus.  As a result of this pattern, the knowledge and understanding of the group’s members become insular, and, to one degree or another, distorted.  Again, this is a sect-like phenomenon.

What is most likely is that when we talk about a “main body” of Muslims, we are not talking about a literal group, but about a consensus of belief and interpretation which adheres to the established consensus and interpretation of the previous generations.  In this case, our Prophet ﷺ told us to adhere to the Jama’ah, which is like his advice in the absence of a Jama’ah, because it means distancing ourselves from sects.  If there is no Jama’ah (meaning if there is no longer any considerable representation of the established beliefs of Ahl us-Sunnah wal-Jama’ah), we are again told to avoid all of the sects, and simply seclude ourselves.  In either case, our recourse is to abstain from joining any sects that may emerge, for they are “callers to the Gates of Hell”.

It should be stated here that being a “caller to the Gates of Hell” does not necessarily mean that they and their followers will be punished with eternal damnation.  It does not necessarily mean that they are apostates inviting others to apostasy; it simply means that their errors are so grave that they constitute major sins, because of which they will earn Allah’s Punishment

In terms of forecasting the future, this is informative because it tells us that the ultimate victory of Islam will not come at the hands of any of these sects; neither the nation-state sects nor the sub-sects that operate within them.  Rather, victory will come from adherence to the main body of the Muslims and to the established consensus of belief and interpretation.

التفاصيل العملية للإسلام السياسي               The nuts and bolts of Political Islam

سيكون على دستور الدولة الإسلامية أن يضع الشريعة كقانون أعلى للبلاد؛ أي أن السلطات التشريعية للحكومة ستقع ضمن حدود هذه المعايير. أما القوانين الأساسية والصريحة للشريعة والمتفق عليها فسيتم تأسيسها دستوريًا، ولن يتم سن أي تشريع يتناقض مع الشريعة الإسلامية.  وإذا وجد أي قانون يتعارض مع الأحكام الصادرة من الكتاب والسنة، سواء منذ البداية أو عند مراجعته في أي وقت لاحق، فسيتم إلغاءه.  الدستور، بالضرورة، سيحتاج أن يكون قابلًا للتعديل بشكل مشروط، ومع ذلك، فإن التعديلات أيضًا لا يمكن أن تتعارض مع الشريعة الإسلامية، وأما وضع الشريعة الإسلامية باعتبارها المصدر الأعلى للتشريع فهذه لا يمكن أبدًا أن تكون عرضة للتغيير أو التعديل.

من الممكن أن نتصور نموذجًا لحكومة تتألف فيه السلطة التشريعية من ثلاثة أقسام: 1) الهيئة الأدنى فيه وهي مثل مجلس النواب تتألف من ممثلين تنتخبهم الجماهير العامة، وهؤلاء عليهم أن يمثلوا مصالح ناخبيهم، ويدعون لاحتياجاتهم ومطالبهم، ويصيغون مقترحات تشريعية وفقا لذلك.  2) أما الهيئة الأعلى فيه فهي مثل مجلس الشيوخ وتتألف من ممثلي منظمات المجتمع المدني والنقابات العمالية، والجمعيات المهنية والأكاديمية وسيكونون منتخبين من قبل أعضاء هذه الجهات، وأي اقتراح تشريعي تقوم بصياغته الهيئة الأدنى سيتم عرضه على الهيئة الأعلى للنظر فيه ومراجعته، وذلك بالاستعانة بمعرفتهم المتخصصة وخبرتهم.  ويمكن للهيئة الأعلى أيضًا أن تقترح التشريعات، وهذه سيكون من شأنها أن يمر عبر الهيئة الأدنى للتصديق الشعبي عليها.  وأي اقتراح تشريعي أقره كل من الهيئتين سيتم عرضه على مجلس أعلى من “العلماء” كي يحددوا مدى مطابقته لأحكام الشريعة.  وإذا اعتبر الاقتراح متعارض مع أحكام الشريعة الإسلامية، سيتم شرح أوجه القصور فيه، وسيعاد هذا الاقتراح الى الهيئة الأدنى للتعديل.  وأما إذا اعتبر الاقتراح متوافق مع أحكام الشريعة الإسلامية، فسيقدم بعد ذلك إلى الحاكم للتصديق أو النقض.

من خلال هذا الهيكل، سيتم صياغة التشريعات أولا كاستجابة لاحتياجات ومطالب الجمهور، وسيعاد النظر فيها من قبل ممثلين من ذوي الخبرة في المجالات ذات الصلة لهذه المقترحات لتحديد سلامتها وتأثيرها الاجتماعي والاقتصادي المحتمل، وأخيرا، سيتم تقييم مدى التزامها بالشريعة الإسلامية، مما يضمن أن أي تشريع سيكون من شأنه أن يلبي الشروط الثلاثة الأكثر أهمية بالنسبة للحكومة الرشيدة.

كما ذكرت عدة مرات، فإن جل ما تفعله الحكومة علاقته قليلة أو تكاد تكون معدومة بالشريعة، فهي تتعامل مع قضايا سياسة دنيوية لن نجد لها توجيهات صريحة في القرآن والسنة.

على سبيل المثال، الهيئة الدنيا للسلطة التشريعية قد تقترح تغيير في برنامج وجبة الغداء المدرسية، أو طلب تمويل إضافي للنقل العام، أو قد تقترح وضع حد أقصى لرواتب المديرين التنفيذيين للشركات.  هذه الأمور لا تعتبر، بالمعنى الدقيق للكلمة، من مسائل الشريعة.  ثم يتم استعراض المقترحات من قبل الهيئة العليا، وتتم دراستها من قبل لجان متخصصة داخلية ومتمرسة في المجالات ذات الصلة (التعليم، ورعاية الأطفال، والصحة، والنقل العام، والاقتصاد والأعمال، الخ) لتحديد جدواها وتأثيرها الاجتماعي. ثم يعرض الاقتراح على مجلس “العلماء” للتقييم، مشفوعًا باستنتاجات الهيئة الأعلى حول فائدة هذا الاقتراح، ليحددوا ما إذا كان هذا القانون الجديد يتفق مع أحكام الشريعة الإسلامية أو لا.

يبدو لي أن هذا الهيكل معقول.  ولكن من الواضح أنه ستكون هناك حاجة إلى تدابير تهدف إلى منع الفساد والمحسوبية والحفاظ على الاستقامة، وهذه ستدرج في الدستور.

ما ذكرته أعلاه هو محاولة لطرح الأفكار، ودعوة للمفكرين الاسلاميين والقادة للبدء بعد كل هذا الوقت في عمل صياغة حقيقية للإسلام السياسي، لكي نقوم بتطوير نموذج نعرضه على الشعوب، بدلا من التصريحات الجوفاء.

هناك كم هائل من العمل مطلوب القيام به، وعلينا أن نقوم بكل هذا حتى قبل أن نبدأ في السعي للسلطة.  فمن أجل أن يكون نموذج مثل الذي اقترحته أعلاه قابلًا للتطبيق، بالتأكيد سيكون هناك قدرًا كبيرًا من العمل التأسيسي مطلوب القيام به، وحتى يكون لدى الإسلاميين أنفسهم فكرة عن كيفية التعامل مع قضايا مثل تلك التي ذكرتها… يوجد الكثير هنا علينا القيام به.  فعلى سبيل المثال، ما هو قول الإسلاميون في برامج وجبات الغداء المدرسية؟ حول وسائل النقل العامة؟ حول التفاوت الكبير بين رواتب المديرين التنفيذيين والعمال العاديين؟ هل لديهم أي أراء؟ هذه هي نوعية القضايا التي تتعامل معها الحكومة، فكيف تسعون للحصول على مناصب حكومية رغم أنه لا توجد لديكم أية مواقف بشأن هذه القضايا؟

لقد حان الوقت لكن نصبح  أكثر جدية!  علينا تحديد المواقف السياسية للإسلام السياسي، وتصميم نموذج للحكومة، والبدء في بناء وحشد الدعم له.

 

تنويه: هذه النسخة منقحة ونهائية!

A constitution for an Islamic state would need to fix the Shari’ah as the supreme law of the land; the legislative powers of the government would be limited within these parameters.  The agreed upon fundamental and explicit laws of the Shari’ah would be constitutionally established, and no legislation could be enacted that contradicted Shari’ah.  If any law was deemed to contradict the rulings of the Kitab wa Sunnah, whether initially or upon review at a later time, it would be annulled.  The constitution, necessarily, would need to be conditionally amendable, however, amendments also could not contradict Islamic Law, and Shari’ah’s status as the supreme source of legislation would not be subject to change or amendment.

It is possible to envision a governmental model in which the legislature is comprised of three sections. The lower house of the legislature would be comprised of representatives elected by the general public.  They would represent the interests of their constituents, advocate their needs and demands, and draft legislative proposals accordingly.  The upper house of the legislature would be comprised of representatives from civil society organizations, labor unions, and professional and academic associations who would be elected by their members.  Any legislative proposal drafted by the lower house would be submitted to the upper house for consideration and review, utilizing their specialized knowledge and experience.  The upper house could also propose legislation, and this would also have to pass through the lower house for popular ratification.  Any legislative proposal passed by the lower and upper houses would then be submitted to the high council of ‘Ulema who would determine its compliance with the Shari’ah.  If the proposal was deemed to contradict with the Shari’ah, its shortcomings would be explained, and the proposal would be returned to the lower houses of the legislature for modification.  If the proposal was deemed compliant with the Shari’ah, it would then be submitted to the ruler for ratification or veto.

In such a structure, legislation would be drafted first to respond to the needs and demands of the public, it would be reviewed by representatives with expertise in the fields relevant to the proposal to determine its soundness and potential socioeconomic impact, and finally, it would be evaluated for its adherence to Islamic Law; thus ensuring that any legislation would meet the three most important requirements for wise government.

As I have mentioned numerous times, the bulk of what government does has little or nothing to do with Shari’ah; it deals with mundane policy issues for which we will not find explicit guidance in the Qur’an and Sunnah.

For example, the lower house of the legislature proposes a change in the school lunch program, or requests additional funding for public transportation, or proposes a cap on the salaries of corporate executives.  Such matters are not, strictly speaking, matters of Shari’ah.  The proposals would be reviewed by the upper house , studied by internal dedicated committees specialized in relevant fields (education, child care, health, mass transit, economics and business, etc) to determine their feasibility and social impact.  The proposal would be submitted to the ‘Ulema for evaluation, including the upper house’s conclusions about the benefits of the proposal, and they would determine if the new law complies with the Shari’ah.

This seems to me like a plausible structure.  Obviously, there would need to be measures to prevent corruption and favoritism and preserve integrity; and these would be included in the constitution.

This is an effort to brainstorm, and an invitation to Islamist thinkers and leaders to finally begin the real work of Political Islam; to develop a model we can offer to the people, instead of hollow rhetoric.

There is a tremendous amount of work to do, and we have to do it before we even begin to seek power.  For a model such as the one I suggested above to be workable, obviously, there is a great deal of groundwork that would need to be done; and even for Islamists to have an idea of how to approach issues like the ones I mentioned, we have work to do. For instance, what do the Islamists have to say about school lunch programs?  About public transportation? About the huge disparity between the salaries of executives and average workers? Do they know?  These are the kinds of things government deals with, so how can you be seeking governmental positions while you have no stance on such issues?

It is time for us to become serious; define the policy positions of Political Islam, design a model for government, and start building support.

الخلفية الاقتصادية للانقلاب الفاشل             Economic background to the failed coup

هناك أمر هام لابد من إيضاحه فيم يتعلق بحزب العدالة والتنمية وأردوغان، لقد قلت في الماضي أنهم في الأساس نيوليبراليين (مثل جماعة الإخوان المسلمين عمومًا)، ولكني أخشى أن أكون قد أفرطت في تبسيط هذا التوصيف. لقد تطور حزب العدالة والتنمية على مر السنين، وكما كتبت في الآونة الأخيرة، فإن أردوغان نفسه يعارض بشدة صندوق النقد الدولي، وهذا يعكس تطور الحزب، بل والمواقف المختلفة داخل الحزب.

محاذاة الاقتصاد مع النيوليبرالية بدأت في السبعينات من القرن المنصرم، ثم تسارع الأمر في الثمانينات في أعقاب الانقلاب العسكري الذي حدث في عام 1980.  تركزت العناصر الرئيسية للبرنامج على تقليص الأجور وترويج الصادرات، وأعقب ذلك التحرر المالي الذي حدث في التسعينات… أما في عام 2001، فقد بدأت تركيا تسير بأقصى سرعة على طريق الإصلاحات النيوليبرالية تحت عنوان “البرنامج الوطني” لوزير الاقتصاد كمال درويش.

وتراكمت الديون على البلاد لصندوق النقد والبنك الدولي، وتعهدوا بخصخصة البنوك العامة، وإنهاء دعم المزارعين، وتجميد الأجور في القطاع العام، وخفض الإنفاق الاجتماعي، وخصخصة جميع الشركات الكبرى المملوكة للدولة في كل قطاع وأتاحتهم للمستثمرين الأجانب. وعندما جاء حزب العدالة والتنمية إلى السلطة، سار على خطى خطة درويش بشكل أو أخر.

وتقريبًا مثل الإخوان في مصر، فقد قبلوا فكرة النيوليبرالية بدون أي أسئلة، وأدى هذا إلى “المعجزة الاقتصادية” التي تحدثت عنها النخب، ولكن تحت القشرة الخارجية كان الوضع بالنسبة للشعب التركي يتدهور، وأصبح الاقتصاد الحقيقي أكثر ضعفًا من أي وقت مضى.  معدل النمو الاقتصادي على مدى السنوات الـ 10 الماضية كان يعتمد إلى حد كبير على الاستثمار الأجنبي ومشاريع البناء، وراحت القوة الشرائية تتناقص باطراد، وارتفعت الديون الشخصية على نطاق واسع، وانخفض التصنيع المحلي، وأخذت الفجوة بين الأغنياء والفقراء في الاتساع.

قبل صعود حزب العدالة والتنمية، احتكرت النخب المعادية للإسلام السلطة السياسية والاقتصادية، وكانت رعاية الدولة دائمًا عاملًا رئيسيًا في القطاع الخاص التركي، ومع صعود حزب العدالة والتنمية إلى السلطة، أوجد هذا الأمر شبكة تجارية إسلامية جديدة من النفوذ.  بعبارة أخرى، فقد استخدم أردوغان وحزب العدالة والتنمية برنامج النيوليبرالية، التي يستفيد منها دائما حفنة صغيرة من النخب المحلية، لتشكيل كوادر من الرأسماليين المسلمين يملكون المال والنفوذ للتنافس مع العلمانيين. وبعد أن حقق ذلك، على مدى السنوات الثلاث الماضية أو نحو ذلك، أصبح أردوغان يأخذ مواقف كثيرة تعكس شخصيته الحقيقية، كشعبوي، كإسلامي، وكمستقل، وبطريقة واضحة كمعادي للنيوليبرالية.  فعلى سبيل المثال، أصبح يدين صندوق النقد الدولي الآن كمؤسسة لها هيمنة سياسية، ويريد كبح جماح البنك المركزي، وخفض أسعار الفائدة، كما أنه رفض بدون أي مواربة “إصلاحات” التقشف.

لقد أصبح أصحاب رؤوس الأموال العالمية متشككون على نحو متزايد في الطريق الذي ستسلكه تركيا تحت استمرار قيادة أردوغان وحزب العدالة والتنمية، مما قد يخبرنا الكثير والكثير عن القصة وراء محاولة الانقلاب الفاشلة يوم الخامس عشر من يوليو.

 

تنويه: هذه النسخة منقحة ونهائية!  

 

It is important to clarify something about the AKP and Erdogan.  I have said in the past that they are essentially neoliberals (like the Muslim Brotherhood generally), but I’m afraid that I may have been over-simplifying in that characterization.  The AKP has evolved over the years, and as I wrote recently, Erdogan himself is strongly opposed to the International Monetary Fund; and this reflects the evolution of the party, and indeed, differing positions within the party.

Aligning the economy with neoliberalism began in the 1970s, and accelerated in the 80s following the 1980 military coup.  The main elements of the program focused on wage suppression and export promotion. This was followed by financial liberalization in the 1990s.  In 2001, Turkey went full-throttle into neoliberal reforms under the “National Program” of economic minister Kemal Dervish.

The country went into debt to the IMF and World Bank, pledged to privatize public banks, end subsidies to farmers, freeze public sector wages, slash social spending, and privatize all major state-owned enterprises in every sector and open them up to foreign investors. When the AKP came to power, they more or less followed Dervish’s plan.

Rather like the Ikhwan in Egypt, they accepted the neoliberal idea with no questions asked.  This led to the “economic miracle” elites talk about, but below the superficial data, the situation for the Turkish people has been deteriorating, and the real economy has become more vulnerable than ever before. Economic growth over the past 10 years has been largely dependent on foreign investment and construction projects.  Purchasing power is steadily decreasing, personal debt is widespread, domestic manufacturing has declined, and the gap between rich and poor is widening.

Before the rise of the AKP, the anti-Islamic elites monopolized political and economic power.  State patronage has always been a major factor in the Turkish private sector, and with the AKP in power, this has created a new Islamist business network of influence.  In other words, Erdogan and the AKP have used the neoliberal program, which always benefits a small handful of local elites, to form a cadre of Muslim capitalists with the money and influence to compete with the secularists.  Having achieved this, over the past three years or so, Erdogan has been increasingly taking positions that must reflect his true character, populist, Islamist, and independent,  and in some important ways, anti-neolibberal.  For instance, he now condemns  the IMF as an institution of political domination, wants to rein in the Central Bank, lower interest rates, and he flat-out rejects Austerity “reforms”.

Global owners of capital have become increasingly dubious about the path Turkey will go under the continued leadership of Erdogan and the AKP, and this may tell us more about the story behind the July 15th cooup attempt than anything else.

الدولة الإسلامية في أحلام اليقظة                 An Islamic State in day-dreams

الخطأ الذي وقعنا فيه فيم يتعلق بالآية التي تتحدث عن الحاكم بغير ما أنزل الله هو أننا تصورنا أن هذه الآية تنطبق حصريًا على الحكومات، ولكن الحقيقة هي أنها آية عامة وتنطبق على كل واحدٍ منا… وعندما ندرك ذلك، فسندرك بالضرورة أن التفسير الحرفي للآية، الذي يدعي بأن أي شخص يحكم بغير ما أنزل الله فهو الكافر، يرقى إلى مستوى التكفير بالمعاصي.

ويجب أن تعرفوا أن أيًا من علماء التفسير لم يأخذ هذه الآية على النحو الحرفي في أي وقت، لأنه كان لديهم ما يكفي من المعرفة السياقية لكي يدركوا أن التفسير الحرفي يتناقض مع أساس عقيدنا.

يذكر ابن حزم أن كل منا قاض، وحاكم، فيم يتعلق بأفعاله، بالتالي ففي أي وقت ترتكب معاصي، أنت تحكم بغير ما أنزل الله، فهل هذا يعني أنك لم تعد مسلمًا؟ طبعا لا!! سيكون هناك انحراف في معتقدنا لو قلنا بهذا.

هل تستخدم بطاقة الائتمان؟ إذا كان الأمر كذلك، فقد وافقت على عقد مكتوب لدفع الربا، حتى إذا دفعت الفاتورة في الوقت المحدد ولم تدفع فعلا أي زيادة (أي ربا)، ولكنك وافقت من حيث المبدأ أن تقبل بذلك. نعم، هذه تعتبر موافقة على صلاحية الربا، وأنت هنا تحكم لنفسك، بغير ما أنزل الله. فهل هذه معصية؟ بدون شك… هل هذا كفر؟ بالطبع لا.

تصرفات الشخص لا تمثل بالضرورة حقيقة إيمانه، فإذا ارتكبت ذنبًا ما فأنت لا تعلن أن الذنب ليس ذنبًا، وأنت لا تُحِله لنفسك لمجرد أنك سمحت لنفسك بفعله. أقصى ما يمكن استخلاصه هو أنك لا تملك بعد السجية، والإيمان، والانضباط، والسيطرة، لمنع نفسك من فعله، على الرغم من أنك تعرف أنه خطأ.

فمن هو الحاكم الذي يملك من السيطرة على شعبه أكثر مما يملك الشخص العادي من السيطرة على أفعاله؟

قد تعرف أو قد لا تعرف أن هناك حكمًا في الإسلام يمنعك من الخروج ضد الكافر الذي يحكمك، إذا لم تكن لديك القدرة على ردعه! فديننا واقعي وعملي، ويعطينا التوجيه في جميع الحالات؛ وبالتالي فإن الظروف والأحوال دائما تلعب دورًا في الحكم الصادر على أي أمر.

قبل الفترة الأخيرة، كانت تركيا في قبضة شيئًا أشق من العلمانية، فقد كانت في تطرف معادي للدين، والحقيقة هي أن هذه العلمانية العدوانية جذريًا كانت لا تتفق مع طبيعة الناس ومعتقداتهم، والحمد لله، ففي خلال الـ10-15 سنة الماضية، انحسر كل هذا. لا… أردوغان ليس على وشك فرض الشريعة على الناس، وسيكون أحمق لو فعلها، وأردوغان أبعد ما يكون عن الحمق.

ليس هناك شك في أن أردوغان رجل متدين، وليس هناك شك في إسلامه، وليس هناك شك في أنه لو فرض الشريعة من جانب واحد في تركيا، فإن ردة الفعل من شأنها أن يضع حدًا لمشروع حزب العدالة والتنمية بأكمله مما سيلقي بالبلاد في أحضان الحرب الأهلية والفوضى.

التقدم الذي تم إحرازه في ظل حكومته لافت للنظر، سياسيًا واقتصاديًا واجتماعيًا ودينيًا، وأيا من هذا ما كان ليحدث إذا أتخذ حزب العدالة والتنمية الطريق الخيالي العجيب الذي يتزعمه الجهاديين والخلافويين.

إذا كنتم تؤمنون حقا بالحكومة الإسلامية، وإذا كان لديكم بالفعل فكرة مستقاه من الواقع لما تعنيه هذه الحكومة، وإذا كنتم تمتلكون من الفطنة ما يكفي، لفهمتم أن الحكومة في تركيا تستحق دعمكم أكثر من أي مجموعة تتظاهر بأنها قادرة على إقامة الدولة الإسلامية بالقوة والعنف، فهذا الأمر يتطلب الصبر والحكمة، والعمل الجاد، والمرونة، والمزيد من الصبر… وهذا هو العالم الحقيقي.

تنويه: هذه النسخة منقحة ونهائية!

The mistake we have fallen into regarding the ayah about ruling by other than what Allah has revealed is that we imagine this ayah applies exclusively to governments. It doesn’t. It is general and applies to each one of us. When you realize that, you necessarily realize that a literal interpretation of the ayah; claiming that anyone who rules by other than what Allah has revealed is a Kafir; amounts to making takfir on the basis of sins.

And you should know that none of the scholars of tafsir ever considered this to be an ayah to be taken literally, because they had enough contextual knowledge to realize that a literal interpretation would contradict our fundamental ‘Aqeedah.

Ibn Hazm stated that every person is a judge, is a ruler, in terms of his own actions. Thus, any time you commit a sin, you are ruling by other than what Allah revealed. Does this mean you are no longer a Muslim? Obviously not. It is a deviant belief to say this.

Do you use a credit card? If so, you have consented in a written contract to pay riba; even if you pay your bill on time and never actually pay riba, you have agreed in principle that you accept to do so. OK, that is agreeing to the validity of riba; you are ruling, for yourself, by other than what Allah has revealed. Is it a sin? Unquestionably. Is it kufr? Of course not.

Someone’s actions do not necessarily represent their belief. If you commit a sin, you are not declaring that the sin is not a sin, you are not making it halaal for yourself just because you allow yourself to do it. The most that can be deduced is that you do not have the character, the imaan, the discipline, the control, to prevent yourself from doing it, although you know it is wrong.

What ruler of a nation has more control over his people than an individual has over his own actions?

You may or may not know that there is a ruling in Islam that you cannot even revolt against a Kafir who rules you, if you do not have the power to succeed. Our religion is realistic and practical, and gives us guidance in all situations; thus, circumstances and conditions always play a role in the ruling in any matter.

Before the recent period, Turkey was in the grip of something more than secularism, it was an anti-religious extremism. The truth is that this radically aggressive secularism was not consistent with the character of the people or their beliefs, and, al-Hamdulillah, over the past 10-15 years, it is receding. No, Erdogan is not on the verge of imposing Shari’ah on the people, and he would be a fool if he was. And Erdogan is far from foolish.

There is no question that Erdogan is a religious man, there is no question about his Islam; and there is no question that if he were to unilaterally impose Shari’ah in Turkey, the backlash would bring an end to the entire project of the AKP and send the country flying into civil war and chaos.

The progress that has been made under his government is remarkable, politically, economically, socially, religiously, and none of that would have happened; none of it; if the AKP had taken the absurdly idealistic route championed by the jihadis and Khilafah-ists.

If you truly believe in Islamic government, and you actually have a reality-based idea of what that means, and you are yourself a rational person, you would understand that the government in Turkey deserves your support more than any group pretending it can establish an Islamic state through force and violence. It requires patience, wisdom, hard work, flexibility, and more patience. That is the real world.