Corporate power

Evaluating the disaster     تقييم الكارثة

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

When I first became involved with the Rohingya cause, my immediate analysis was that the mutual economic interests of the Myanmar ruling class and of the international business community were driving the genocidal policy of the government.

I believed that multinational corporations were unbothered by the ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya, and that they, indeed, approved of what the regime was doing in Rakhine because it represented a tried and true policy for conflict management and the consolidation of control over resources.

I did not propose that we could expect MNCs to see the genocide as being bad for business, in and of itself, because, from the standpoint of business, it certainly is not.  Business has taken an approving posture on this issue precisely because it is a good policy for business.  What I proposed was that what activists needed to do was to make it bad for business by imposing negative consequences in the marketplace upon companies that supported the regime, or were otherwise silent and indifferent about the genocide.  Without doing this, because companies are not moral entities, there would be no way to convince them that genocide was a bad idea.

The genocide of the Rohingya has given the regime expanded control over land and resources in Rakhine, decreased official unemployment figures (by expelling hundreds of thousands of people from the potential work force), reduced competition for jobs, cleared land for development, and of course, created sprawling refugee camps both inside and outside the country which can be used as depositories for goods in an essentially captive market, paid for by governments and private donations as part of the humanitarian relief industrial complex.  From all angles, it is good for business.  And this is something the international business community has perceived all along.

This is why the only conceivable way for us to have had an impact would have been to offset that dynamic by imposing negative market consequences, and alternatively, by bestowing market rewards for companies that took a good stance against the genocide.

As I have written time and time again, this is something that can only be achieved through grassroots consumer activism.  We are the crucial element in determining whether any policy is profitable or unprofitable.  A company like Unilever under the astute leadership of Paul Polman realized the potential danger the genocide posed to their regional reputation, and thus to their expected profitability in Southeast Asia; and this is why Unilever issued a public statement in support of the Rohingya.  No one in the campaign was under the illusion that Unilever sincerely cares about the Rohingya.  What they cared about was negative backlash in the regional market, and that is exactly how we argued the case with Polman.

But, at the end of the day, we needed to be able to mobilize that kind of backlash.  Even if we never had to implement it, it had to be something we genuinely had the power to do.  Unfortunately, in my opinion, the activists and organizations concerned with the Rohingya issue have been entirely too unfocused, reactionary, and have continued to rely on strategies that have endlessly proven to be futile; and so here we are today with the genocide, for all intents and purposes, successful.  No doubt, we did not do enough to spread awareness and understanding of our approach, and did not do enough to try to mobilize on the grassroots level.  But nothing whatsoever has occurred that invalidates my initial analysis or the strategy we adopted.  On the contrary; the futile strategies of the past have been proved futile once again, with devastating consequences.

Our solitary condemnation of ARSA too, was entirely justified, and the horrific consequences of their recklessness which we predicted have been fulfilled, and may yet unfold into even worse disasters in the future.

Myanmar may indeed seek repatriation of Rohingya refugees because only a couple hundred thousand Rohingya may be insufficient to be utilized as an instrument for distraction and fear to control the ethnic Rakhine population, or as a tool for maintaining low wages.  If there ever does materialize American or other international military intervention in Rakhine, it will be for this reason; not because the regime committed genocide, but because they mismanaged it.  If the US does intervene militarily (something highly doubtful), they will do so without the slightest interest in the welfare of the Rohingya, but rather as a means of seizing opportunities created by the genocide to preempt China from doing so.

And, still, the same reality holds true.  Only by democratizing corporate power through consumer activism are we ever going to be able to influence events, change policies, and prevent man-made catastrophes like the Rohingya genocide.

عندما بدأت المشاركة في قضية الروهينجا لأول مرة، كان تحليلي الفوري هو أن المصالح الاقتصادية المتبادلة للطبقة الحاكمة في ميانمار والمجتمع التجاري الدولي هي التي تقود سياسة الإبادة الجماعية التي تتبعها الحكومة.

واعتقدت أن الشركات متعددة الجنسيات لن تبالي بالتطهير العرقي للروهينجا، وأنها بالفعل وافقت على ما كان النظام يقوم به في راخين لأنه يمثل سياسة مجربة وحقيقية لإدارة الصراع وتوطيد السيطرة على الموارد.

ولم أقترح أن نتوقع من الشركات متعددة الجنسيات أن ترى الإبادة الجماعية على أنها في حد ذاتها سيئة للأعمال التجارية، لأنها من وجهة نظر الأعمال التجارية، ليست كذلك بالتأكيد، فقد اتخذت الأعمال التجارية موقف الموافقة على هذه المسألة على وجه التحديد لأنها سياسة جيدة للأعمال التجارية. وما اقترحته هو أن ما یجب علی الناشطین القیام به ھو جعل هذه الإبادة سيئة للأعمال التجاریة من خلال فرض عواقب سلبیة على السوق وعلی الشرکات التي تدعم النظام، أو الشركات الصامتة وغیر المبالیة بالإبادة الجماعیة. فبدون القيام بذلك، ولأن الشركات ليست كيانات أخلاقية، لن تكون هناك وسيلة لإقناعها بأن الإبادة الجماعية فكرة سيئة.

لقد أتاحت الإبادة الجماعية للروهينجا توسيع سيطرة النظام على الأراضي والموارد في راخين، وخفض الأرقام الرسمية للبطالة (عن طريق طرد مئات الآلاف من الناس خارج قوة سوق العمل المحتملة)، وخفض المنافسة على فرص العمل، وإخلاء الأرض من أجل التنمية، وبالطبع خلقت مخيمات لاجئين مترامية الأطراف داخل وخارج البلاد على حد سواء ليتم استخدامها فيم بعد كمستودعات للبضائع في سوق “أسير” حرفيًا، تنفق عليه الحكومات وتبرعات القطاع الخاص كجزء من المجتمع الصناعي لإغاثة الإنسانية. من جميع الزوايا، هذا شيء جيد لرجال الأعمال، وهو شيء يصبو إليه مجتمع الأعمال الدولي طوال الوقت.

وهذا هو السبب في أن الطريقة الوحيدة التي يمكن أن نتصور أن يكون لها أثر في مواجهة هذه الدينامية، هي فرض عواقب سلبية على أسواق الشركات الصامتة، وفي المقابل يمكن مكافأة أسواق للشركات التي ستتخذ موقفا واضحا ضد الإبادة الجماعية.

كما كتبت مرارا وتكرارا، هذا شيء لا يمكن تحقيقه إلا من خلال النشاط الاستهلاكي الشعبي. نحن نمثل العنصر الحاسم في تحديد ما إذا كانت أية سياسة ستصبح مربحة أو غير مربحة. لقد أدركت شركة مثل يونيليفر تحت القيادة الحكيمة لبول بولمان الخطر المحتمل الذي تمثله الإبادة الجماعية على سمعتها الإقليمية، وبالتالي على الربحية المتوقعة في جنوب شرق آسيا. وهذا هو السبب في إصدار يونيليفر بيانا عاما لدعم الروهينجا. لا أحد في الحملة يظن للحظة أن يونيليفر تبالي بصدق بالروهينجا، ولكن كل ما يقلقها هو رد الفعل السلبي في السوق الإقليمية، وهذا هو بالضبط ما اتبعناه في إيضاح القضية لبولمان.

ولكننا في نهاية المطاف، كنا بحاجة إلى القدرة على حشد هذا النوع من رد الفعل الحاسم، حتى وإن لم نضطر لتنفيذه، إلا أنه كان يجب أن يكون شيئا نحن قادرين فعلا على القيام به. لسوء الحظ، في رأيي، فإن الناشطين والمنظمات المعنية بقضية الروهينجا مشتتة وتعتمد على ردود الأفعال وهي تواصل الاعتماد على استراتيجيات أثبتت أنها بلا جدوى. وها نحن اليوم نواجه بإبادة جماعية ناجحة بكامل نيتها ومقاصدها… لا شك أننا لم نفعل ما يكفي لنشر الوعي بهذا النهج، ولم نفعل ما يكفي لمحاولة التعبئة على المستوى الشعبي. ولكن لم يحدث أي شيء على الإطلاق يلغي تحليلي الأولي أو الإستراتيجية التي اعتمدتاها. ولكن على العكس تماما؛ فقد ثبتت جدوى استراتيجيات الماضي غير المجدية، مع ما يترتب على ذلك من نتائج مدمرة.

كما أن إدانتنا المنفردة لجيش خلاص أراكان (ARSA) كانت مبررة تماما، فالعواقب المروعة لتهورهم التي توقعناها تحققت، وقد تتكشف بعد في كوارث أكثر سوءا في المستقبل.

وقد تسعى ميانمار بالفعل إلى إعادة اللاجئين الروهينجا إلى أوطانهم لأن بضع مئات من آلاف الروهينجا قد لا تكون كافية للاستفادة منهم كأداة إلهاء وتخويف لفرض السيطرة على سكان راخين العرقيين، أو كأداة للحفاظ على أجور منخفضة. إن ظهر في المستقبل أي داعي للتدخل العسكري الأمريكي أو الدولي في راخين، فسيكون لسبب واحد فقط ليس هناك غيره؛ وهذا السبب ليس لأن النظام ارتكب إبادة جماعية، ولكن لأنه أساء إدارتها. إذا تدخلت الولايات المتحدة عسكريا (وهذا شيء مشكوك فيه جدا)، فإنها ستفعل ذلك دون أدنى مصلحة لرفاهية الروهينجا، ولكن كوسيلة لاغتنام الفرص التي خلقتها الإبادة الجماعية وفقط لاستباق الصين في هذا المضمار.

ومع ذلك فالواقع قائم كما هو: فقط إن تم تحويل مسار الشركات إلى المسار الديمقراطي من خلال النشاط الاستهلاكي، سنكون قادرين على التأثير على الأحداث، وتغيير السياسات، ومنع الكوارث التي من صنع الإنسان مثل الإبادة الجماعية للروهينجا.

Advertisements

Getting companies to peck the right button                       كيف نجعل الشركات تنقر الزر الصحيح؟

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

Activist campaigns that target corporations conventionally focus on trying to change the operational practices of those companies which in many cases will, by extension, impact the broader society.  What we are trying to do is to elevate this approach to the level of how companies use their political influence.  Corporations lobby governments to secure policies favorable to their businesses; often even if those policies are unfavorable to the general public.

Our contention is that, as their consumer constituencies, we have the right to expect companies to use their political influence in ways that reflect and address our concerns, our values, and so on.  Of course, we do not expect that they will feel obliged by our mere belief that we should be represented and that our interests should be served when they exercise their influence.  We recognise that the only way to democratize their influence is by translating our demands into the binary language of corporate profitability.

In other words, we do not expect them to take the actions we want them to take simply because those actions are moral, just, or right; no, we have to create a profit-driven reason for them to take moral, just, and right actions.

This is a matter of operant conditioning.  When researchers trained pigeons to correctly distinguish between paintings by Chagall  and Van Gogh by rewarding them with grain when they pecked the right button, they did not create art connoisseurs, they just taught the pigeons a new set of conditions for earning food.  We are not imagining that we can transform corporations into morally-driven entities, but we can teach them a new set of conditions for earning our customer loyalty.  They will peck the right button for the same reasons the pigeons did, but their reasons are irrelevant as long as the desired result is achieved.

تركز حملات الناشطين التي تستهدف الشركات كل جهودها بشكل عام على محاولة تغيير الممارسات التشغيلية لتلك الشركات التي يرون أنها غالبا ستؤثر على المجتمع الأوسع نطاقا. أما ما نحاول نحن القيام به فهو ترقية هذا النهج لنصل إلى مستوى كيفية استخدام الشركات لنفوذها السياسي. الشركات تمارس الضغوط السياسية على الحكومات لتأمين سياسات مواتية لأعمالها؛ وغالبا ما تكون هذه السياسات غير مؤاتية لعامة الناس.

والمحك الحقيقي هنا هو، بما أننا نشكل دوائر مستهلكي هذه الشركات، فنحن ننتظر منهم استخدام نفوذهم السياسي بطرق تعكس وتعالج قضايانا وقيمنا وما إلى ذلك. وبكل تأكيد نحن لا نتوقع أن نلزمهم بما نعتقده من أنهم يجب أن يمثلوننا وأنهم يجب أن يخدموا مصالحنا عندما يمارسون نفوذهم. فنحن ندرك أن السبيل الوحيد لتحويل نفوذهم إلى المسار الديمقراطي هو عندما نترجم مطالبنا هذه إلى اللغة الثنائية التي يفهمونها وهي “لغة الربح أو الخسارة”.

بعبارة أخرى، نحن لا نتوقع منهم أن يتخذوا الإجراءات التي نريدهم أن يتخذوها لا لشيء إلا لأن هذه المطالب أخلاقية أو عادلة أو صحيحة؛ لا… بل علينا أن نخلق سببا مدفوعا بالربح حتى نجعلهم يتخذون هذه الإجراءات الأخلاقية، والعادلة، والصحيحة.

وهذا ما نسميه “التكيف الفعال”. عندما قام الباحثون بتدريب الحمام على التفريق بشكل صحيح بين اللوحات التي رسمها فنانون مثل شاغال وفان جوخ عن طريق مكافئتهم بالحبوب عندما كانوا ينقرون على الزر الصحيح، فهم لم يخلقوا خبراء في الفن، ولكنهم فقط علموا الحمام مجموعة جديدة من الشروط للحصول على الطعام. بنفس هذه الطريقة، نحن لا نتصور أن نحول الشركات إلى كيانات مدفوعة بالأخلاق، ولكن يمكننا أن نعلمهم مجموعة جديدة من الشروط لكسب ولاء العملاء. وهذا سيجعلهم ينقرون على الزر الصحيح لنفس الأسباب التي جعلت الحمام يفعل نفس الشيء، وستظل الأسباب غير ذات صلة طالما تم تحقيق النتيجة المرجوة.

Does Nestlé care? Consumers want to know     هل نستلة فعلا تهتم؟ المستهلك يريد أن يعرف

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

Nestle says, “The impact that we have locally has the potential to be felt internationally; the ideas that you bring to life today could shape our future”.  I couldn’t agree more.  The impact Nestle has internationally can also, of course, be felt locally.

Nearly half the entire Rohingya population in Rakhine state has been either murdered or expelled in what is the 21st Century’s most glaring case of ethnic cleansing; it is increasingly difficult to not characterize what is happening in Myanmar as a full-blown genocide.  Nestle is one of the biggest companies in the world, even without its significant investment in Myanmar, they possess the kind of global influence that could potentially persuade the regime in Yangon to not only halt its pogroms in Rakhine, but indeed, to reverse its policy of repression against the Rohingya.

It is absolutely essential for the most powerful players in the international business community to back up the United Nations’ and the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State’s recommendations for resolving the crisis in Myanmar if they are ever going to bear fruit.  We cannot talk about powerful players without talking about Nestle, the largest foods company on Earth.  Any word from Nestle weighs heavily on the scales of policy-making, not only in Myanmar, but around the world.  Their silence is just as significant.

When major companies like Nestle do not take a stand against genocide, it is interpreted by the regime as permission; and it will be interpreted by consumers as either indifference at best, or actual complicity and collusion at worst.

Nestle has been admirably responsive to public grievances in many instances, such as the recent campaign by Greenpeace over the company’s use of palm oil from Sinar Mas.  They took many steps to address the concerns; steps that no doubt came at a considerable expense for Nestle.

Condemning genocide costs nothing.

What Nestle stands to lose by speaking out is negligible compared to what they stand to lose by their silence; and indeed, to what they stand to gain by taking a stand.  The people in the Southeast Asian region care tremendously about the Rohingya issue; tempers are running high as the pogroms continue while the international community seems to remain largely ineffectual.  A “Day of Anger” has been announced for November 5th, with protests planned in Malaysia and around the world.  But directionless outrage and frustration can lead to very negative and even destructive consequences.  It is time for the global business leaders like Nestle to take the lead in reining in the Myanmar regime by letting them know that multinational corporations and foreign investors do not approve, and will not tolerate the crimes against humanity being perpetrated against the Rohingya.

It is time for Nestle and other leading companies to align themselves with the call for peace and justice in Rakhine.  It is time for Nestle to declare that “We Are All Rohingya Now”.

 

تقول شركة نستلة: “إن التأثير الذي نملكه محليا لديه كل الإمكانات ليكون محسوسًا في العالم كله، فالأفكار التي نجلبها إلى الحياة اليوم هي نفسها التي تشكل مستقبلنا”. وأنا أتفق مع هذه المقولة تمامًا، فالتأثير الذي تحدثه نستلة دوليًا يمكن، بطبيعة الحال، أن نشعر به محليًا.

ما يقرب من نصف سكان الروهينجا في ولاية راخين بالكامل، إما قتلوا أو طردوا في ما هو يعتبر أكثر حالة صارخة للتطهير العرقي في القرن الحادي والعشرين؛ يصعب بشكل كبير ألا نصف ما يحدث في ميانمار بأنه إبادة جماعية كاملة. وشركة نستلة واحدة من أكبر الشركات في العالم، حتى من دون استثمارات كبيرة في ميانمار، فإنها تمتلك نوع من التأثير العالمي يمكن بشكل كبير أن يقنع النظام في يانغون ليس فقط أن ينهي المذابح في راخين، بل أيضا أن يعكس سياسته القمعية ضد الروهينجا.

من الضروري للغاية لأقوى اللاعبين في مجتمع الأعمال الدولي أن يدعموا توصيات الأمم المتحدة واللجنة الاستشارية المعنية بولاية راخين لحل الأزمة في ميانمار إذا كان مقدرا لهذه التوصيات أن تؤتي أي ثمار. لا يمكننا التحدث عن لاعبين أقوياء دون التحدث عن نستلة، أكبر شركة للأغذية على الأرض. فأي كلمة من نستلة تزن الكثير على موازين صنع السياسات، ليس فقط في ميانمار، ولكن في جميع أنحاء العالم. وبالتالي فإن صمتهم لا يقل أهمية.

فعندما لا تتخذ شركات كبرى مثل نستلة موقفا ضد الإبادة الجماعية، فهذا يفسره النظام على أنه إذن بأن يستمر في أفاعيله؛ وسيفسره المستهلكون على أنه إما لامبالاة في أحسن الأحوال، أو تواطؤ فعلي ودعم في أسوأ الأحوال.

وقد استجابت نستلة بشكل مثير للإعجاب للمظالم العامة في كثير من الحالات، مثل حملة غرينبيس (Greenpeace) الأخيرة حول استخدام الشركة لزيت النخيل من سينار ماس. واتخذوا العديد من الخطوات لمعالجة المشكلة؛ وهي خطوات لا شك كلفت شركة نستلة الكثير من المال.

أما إدانة الإبادة الجماعية فهي لن تكلفهم أي شيء على الإطلاق.

ما تخاطر نستلة بأن تفقده لو تحدثت لا يكاد يذكر مقارنة بما ستخسره بسبب صمتها؛ وبالتأكيد مقارنة بما ستكتسبه لو اتخذت موقفًا واضحًا. الشعوب في منطقة جنوب شرق آسيا تهتم بشكل كبير بقضية الروهينجا، وحدة التوتر تتزايد مع استمرار المذابح في حين يبدو أن المجتمع الدولي لا يزال غير فعال إلى حد كبير. حتى أنه قد تم إعلان “يوم الغضب” ليكون في الخامس من نوفمبر القادم مع تنظيم احتجاجات في ماليزيا وحول العالم. ولكننا نعرف أن الغضب والإحباط بدون أي اتجاه قد يؤديان في الغالب إلى عواقب سلبية جدا ومدمرة جدا. لقد حان الوقت لقادة الأعمال العالميين مثل نستلة أن يأخذوا بزمام المبادرة في ترويض نظام ميانمار لكي يعلمونهم أن الشركات متعددة الجنسيات والمستثمرين الأجانب لا يوافقون، ولن يتسامحوا مع الجرائم ضد الإنسانية التي ترتكب ضد الروهينجا.

لقد آن الأوان لكي تتوافق شركة نستلة وغيرها من الشركات الرائدة مع الدعوة إلى السلام والعدالة في راخين. لقد حان الوقت لنستلة أن تعلنها عالية مدوية: ” We Are All Rohingya Now – كلنا روهينجا الآن”

The necessity of the moral corporate voice                         أهمية الصوت الأخلاقي للشركات

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

From a Public Relations perspective, I can’t think of an easier way for a company to show its humanity than by condemning genocide and endorsing recommendations for a peaceful resolution in Myanmar.

The United Nations, the official body representing international consensus has already characterised the situation in Rakhine state as a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing“.  The Advisory Commission on Rakhine State, which issued a detailed report about the repression and violence against the Rohingya and offered solutions, was a project of the Kofi Annan Foundation, headed by the former UN Secretary General who initiated the Global Compact with big business in the year 2000.  There is no controversy in the international community about the nature of what is happening in Myanmar, and companies risk nothing by taking a stand consistent with the position of the UN.  On the contrary, reluctance to do so sends a very negative message making people wonder if companies invested in Myanmar even care that crimes against humanity are being committed; or worse, if they might actually approve of the genocide.

Western multinationals may feel that their foothold in Myanmar is delicate, and that they are at a disadvantage compared to China.  They may believe that if they take a stand on the Rohingya issue, Myanmar will simply rush into the arms of Chinese companies and investors, and they will lose their position in the country.  But the truth is, if they do not take a stand, they run the risk of alienating the broader market of 600 million consumers in Southeast Asia, not to mention people worldwide who are concerned about this issue.

Myanmar is extremely interested in diversifying the sources of its Foreign Direct Investment, and by definition, investment by Western companies brings more value than investment by Chinese companies.  The value of investment is not always derived from the amount of capital, but by the importance of the source of the capital.  And Myanmar is struggling to move away from dependence on Chinese financial support.  Furthermore, the core cause of the violence in Rakhine state is based on the economic ambitions of the government, with a view to improving its position for collaboration with foreign investors and corporations.  A public statement against the violence, and calling for implementation of UN recommendations would be far more likely to result in a cessation of ethnic cleansing than a rejection of Western companies.

Companies like Unilever, Nestle, Shell Oil, Chevron, and so forth, are the targets of almost continuous negative campaigns by human rights and environmental activists who portray them as ruthless, inhuman and corrupt entities that care more about profits than people.  Obviously, this is unfair and simplistic and overlooks the many positive initiatives these companies undertake for the populations where they operate.  But keeping silent about something as horrific as genocide will make it very difficult for any average person to view a company as socially responsible no matter what else it does to prove that it cares about humanity. And, of course, this negative perception will have detrimental market implications.

If taking a stand against crimes against humanity is not the lowest standard of corporate social responsibility, I don’t know what is.  It is becoming more urgent by the day for the international business community to align itself with the consensus of the broader international community and let their customers know where they stand before their silence is interpreted as either indifference or complicity.

We sincerely urge all major corporate investors in Myanmar, and even those who have not entered Myanmar, to join with their consumer constituents, with the United Nations, and with companies like Unilever and Telenor, to publicly declare “We Are All Rohingya Now”.

 

من وجهة نظر علاقات عامة بحته، لا يسعني أن أفكر في طريقة أسهل للشركة لإظهار إنسانيتها إلا من خلال إدانة الإبادة الجماعية وتأييد التوصيات التي تسعى إلى حل سلمي في ميانمار.

لقد وصفت الأمم المتحدة، وهي الهيئة الرسمية التي تمثل توافق الآراء الدولي، الحالة في ولاية راخين بأنها “كتاب عملي في التطهير العرقي”. وكانت اللجنة الاستشارية المختصة براخين، التي أصدرت تقريرا مفصلا عن القمع والعنف ضد الروهينجا وعرضت حلولها، مشروعا لمؤسسة كوفي عنان حيث يترأسها الأمين العام السابق للأمم المتحدة الذي أطلق الاتفاقية العالمية للأعمال التجارية الكبرى في عام 2000 (Global Compact). لا يوجد أي جدل في المجتمع الدولي حول طبيعة ما يحدث في ميانمار، ولن تخاطر الشركات بأي شيء لو اتخذت موقفا يتفق مع موقف الأمم المتحدة. بل على العكس من ذلك، فإن الإحجام عن القيام بذلك سيبعث برسالة سلبية جدا مما يجعل الناس يتساءلون عما إذا كانت الشركات المستثمرة في ميانمار تعبأ بارتكاب الجرائم ضد الإنسانية؛ أو قد يظنون أسوأ من هذا وهو أن الشركات توافق فعليا على الإبادة الجماعية.

قد تشعر الشركات متعددة الجنسيات الغربية بأن موطئ قدمها في ميانمار غير ثابت، وأنها في وضع غير مؤات بالمقارنة مع الصين. وقد يعتقدون أنهم إذا اتخذوا موقفا حول قضية الروهينجا فربما سترتمي ميانمار في أحضان الشركات والمستثمرين الصينيين مما سيفقدهم مراكزهم فى البلاد. ولكن الحقيقة هي أنهم إن لم يتخذوا موقفا، فإنهم سيواجهون خطر خسارة السوق الأوسع البالغ 600 مليون مستهلك في جنوب شرق آسيا، ناهيك عن أن الشعوب من جميع أنحاء العالم ستشعر بالقلق إزاء هذه السلبية.

ميانمار تهتم للغاية بتنويع مصادر استثمارها الأجنبي المباشر، وبالتحديد، استثمار الشركات الغربية لآنه يجلب قيمة أكبر من الاستثمارات التي تقدمها الشركات الصينية. فقيمة الاستثمار لا تستمد دائما من مقدار رأس المال، بل من أهمية مصدر رأس المال. كما أن ميانمار تكافح من اجل الابتعاد عن الاعتماد على الدعم المالي الصيني. وعلاوة على ذلك، فإن السبب الأساسي للعنف في ولاية راخين يستند إلى الطموحات الاقتصادية للحكومة، بهدف تحسين موقفها من التعاون مع المستثمرين والشركات الأجنبية. ومن المرجح جدا أن التصريح العلني ضد العنف والدعوة إلى تنفيذ توصيات الأمم المتحدة سيجبرات ميانمار على إيقاف التطهير العرقي بدلا من رفضها للشركات الغربية.

شركات مثل يونيليفر ونستله وشل للنفط وشيفرون…الخ، كانت أهدافا لحملات سلبية لا تتوقف تقريبا من قبل مؤسسات حقوق الإنسان ونشطاء البيئية الذين يصورونهم ككيانات فاسدة بلا رحمة ولا إنسانية لأنهم يهتمون بالأرباح أكثر من الناس. وطبعا هذا كلام ساذج وغير عادل ويتجاهل المبادرات الإيجابية العديدة التي تقوم بها هذه الشركات لسكان الدول التي يعملون فيها. ولكن السكوت عن شيء مروع مثل الإبادة الجماعية سيجعل من الصعب جدا على أي شخص عادي أن يرى هذه الشركات باعتبارها مسؤولة اجتماعيا بغض النظر عما تفعله لإثبات أنها تهتم بالإنسانية. وبطبيعة الحال، فإن هذا التصور السلبي سيكون له آثارا ضارة على السوق.

إن كان أخذ موقفا واضحا ورافضا للجرائم ضد الإنسانية ليس هو أقل ما يمكن عمله ضمن نطاق المسؤولية الاجتماعية للشركات، فأنا لا أعرف ما هو أقل شيء إذا! لقد أصبح اصطفاف مجتمع الأعمال الدولي مع توافق المجتمع الدولي الأوسع ضرورة ملحة تتزايد يوما بعد يوم، حتى يعرف عملاء هذه الشركات أين تقف شركاتهم المفضلة، قبل أن يتم تفسير صمتهم على أنه إما لامبالاة أو تواطؤ.

نحن نحث جميع المستثمرين الرئيسيين للشركات في ميانمار، وحتى من لم يدخلوا ميانمار، على الانضمام إلى ناخبيهم من المستهلكين، ومع الأمم المتحدة، ومع شركات مثل يونيليفر وتيلينور، لكي يعلنونها واضحة: ” We Are All Rohingya Now – كلنا روهينجا الآن!”

Using corporate logic for social change                         استخدام منطق الشركات لإحداث تغييرات مجتمعية

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

It is not really viable for society to impose accountability on some powerful institutions and not on others.  That is the basic issue with corporations.  But the onus of responsibility for imposing accountability, of course, is not going to fall upon the institutions themselves; it has to be undertaken by the people.  Just as it is the case with democratic government, if you want to impose accountability, you have to turn up at the polling booth and vote; we also have to actually utilize the existing mechanisms for imposing accountability on institutions of private power.  For corporations, that means utilizing market forces; it means, in fact, becoming a force in the market.

The completely transparent and binary decision-making process of companies makes this very straightforward. They are concerned with whether a policy is profitable or unprofitable, and no one, ultimately, determines whether a policy will be profitable or unprofitable except consumers.  This is entirely our responsibility. Companies learn from our behaviour and they follow whatever the market tells them; they have to.

It is possible for us to create a new dynamic whereby companies will actually compete with each other to be more responsive to public demands on how they use their political influence, if the market rewards them for this responsiveness; if it is actually more profitable to be responsive, and if ignoring demands leads to financial loss.

Major corporations have no problem whatsoever pressuring governments for legislative changes if they believe laws are detrimental to their business interests; they are not the least bit reluctant to push for laws and policies that they believe will make it easier and more profitable for their companies to operate; and more often than not, they get what they want.  So there is no question about whether or not corporations have the power to affect change when their own interests are at stake; they do it all the time.  Our challenge is to create a scenario in which what we want companies to do for us is also something they will want to do because it benefits them.

ليس من المجدي حقا أن يفرض المجتمع المساءلة على بعض المؤسسات القوية ولا ترفضه على مؤسسات أخرى، وتلك هي القضية الأساسية فيم يخص الشركات. إلا أن مسؤولية فرض المساءلة لن تقع بالطبع على المؤسسات ذاتها لأن الشعب نفسه هو الذي يجب أن يضطلع بهذه المسؤولية. وكما أنك عندما ترغب في فرض المساءلة على الحكومة الديمقراطية تذهب إلى صناديق الاقتراع والتصويت؛ فبنفس الطريقة علينا أن نستفيد فعلا من الآليات القائمة لفرض المساءلة على مؤسسات السلطة الخاصة. وبالنسبة للشركات، هذا يعني استخدام قوى السوق؛ وهذا يعني، أيضا أن نصبح “قوة” في السوق.

عملية صنع القرار الشفافة تماما والثنائية في الشركات تجعل هذا واضحا جدا، فهم مهتمون بما إذا كانت أي سياسة مربحة أو غير مربحة، ولا أحد يحدد، في نهاية المطاف، ما إذا كانت أي سياسة ستصبح مربحة أو لا إلا المستهلكين أنفسهم، فهذه مسؤوليتنا نحن بالكلية. فالشركات تتعلم من سلوكنا ثم تسير وراء ما يخبرهم به السوق؛ وهم مضطرون لفعل هذا.

من الممكن لنا أن نخلق دينامية جديدة تتنافس فيها الشركات بالفعل مع بعضها البعض لتكون أكثر استجابة للمطالب العامة حول كيفية استخدام نفوذهم السياسي، إذا كان السوق سيكافئهم على هذه الاستجابة، أي إذا كانت الاستجابة أكثر ربحية لهم، وإذا كان تجاهل المطالب سيؤدي إلى خسارة مالية.

الشركات الكبرى ليس لديها مشكلة على الإطلاق أن تضغط على الحكومات لإجراء تغييرات تشريعية إذا كانوا يعتقدون أن القوانين تضر بمصالحهم التجارية. فهم لا تنقصهم أي إرادة عن الدفع بالقوانين والسياسات التي يعتقدون أنها ستجعل عمل شركاتهم أسهل وأكثر ربحية. وغالبا هم يحصلون على ما يريدون. لذلك ليس هناك شك فيم إذا كانت الشركات لديها القدرة على التأثير على التغيير عندما تكون مصالحها الخاصة معرضة للخطر؛ فهم يفعلون ذلك طوال الوقت.

إن التحدي الماثل أمامنا هو خلق السيناريو الذي تكون فيه رغباتنا ومطالبنا التي نطالب الشركات بها، هي نفسها رغبات هذه الشركات لأنها تستفيد منها.

Corporate giants affirming support for Rohingya         الشركات العملاقة تؤكد على دعمها للروهينجا

لقراءة هذا الخبر مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

An ongoing military operation in Rakhine state which the government claims targets militants, but which has caused at least 30% of the Rohingya civilian population to flee the country, and left possibly thousands dead; is raising ethical questions about foreign investment in a country accused of committing genocide.

The #WeAreAllRohingyaNow Campaign, an initiative by independent activists around the world, has been highlighting the role of the international business community in contributing to a solution to the crisis. “If you compare the world news coverage of Myanmar and the reporting in the business press, you would think they are talking about two different countries,” says Jamila Hanan, the campaign’s director.  “On the one hand, the United Nations is saying that Myanmar presents a textbook case of ethnic cleansing, and the Security Council is condemning the scorched-earth policy of the army; and on the other hand, Myanmar is being touted as a great destination for foreign investment, with no reluctance being expressed about mass killings, gang-rapes, and the displacement of hundreds of thousands of innocent people. Investors are increasingly going to have to take a stand on this issue unless they want their brands to be associated with crimes against humanity.”

#WeAreAllRohingyaNow has been reaching out to multinational corporations invested in Myanmar and urging them to publicly commit to the protection of the Rohingya, often referred to as “the world’s most persecuted minority”, and to endorse United Nations recommendations for resolving the crisis.

The first company to respond to their call was Unilever, the third largest consumer goods company in the world.  “CEO Paul Polman replied to us immediately, and after a brief social media campaign, Unilever did indeed publicly affirm its support for the Rohingya,” Hanan explains.  “After a much longer campaign, we were able to help Norwegian telecom company Telenor, also a major investor in Myanmar, understand the urgency of the issue, and they too pledged their commitment to the human rights of the Rohingya”.

The campaign’s strategy seems to be turning the tide in favour of a business-led effort to end the genocide.  On Saturday, Paul Polman joined the #WeAreAllRohingyaNow hashtag on Twitter, in a tweet emphasizing the importance of reviving empathy in international relations, and presumably, in business as well.  As major corporations are beginning to doubt the wisdom of doing business amidst ongoing ethnic cleansing, even governments are becoming more sensitive about pursuing trade agreements with Myanmar.  On 14 September, the European Parliament Committee on International Trade decided to postpone indefinitely its visit to Myanmar due to the deteriorating human rights situation in the country. The Chair of the Committee, Bernd Lange said in a press statement “It is clear that under these conditions, the ratification of an investment agreement with Myanmar is not possible”.

“Rakhine state holds much of Myanmar’s untapped resources,” says Shahid Bolsen, the Campaign’s chief strategist.  “It is going to be extremely difficult for investors to benefit from the development of those resources without being regarded as complicit in the crimes of the army; particularly since there are development plans in precisely those areas where massacres are taking place.  Furthermore, even companies that have no direct interests in Rakhine state are, nevertheless, starting to be viewed as enablers of the army’s crackdown because the regime is facing no economic backlash from investors, which seems to embolden the government to defy international criticism”.

The government in Yangon still believes that its iron-fisted policy in Rakhine state will not alienate investors.  U Aung Naing Oo, director-general of Directorate of Investment and Company Administration said on Friday, “Ongoing conflicts do not have an impact on foreign investment, so we have nothing to worry about”.  However, his further contention that businessmen “care more about their business opportunities” than about human rights violations and political repression, seems to run counter to what was expressed by Paul Polman when he tweeted, “We have forgotten how to rescue each other. Human empathy is key to our survival”

The #WeAreAllRohingyaNow Campaign has highlighted the role of the private sector in resolving the crisis in Myanmar, and more and more companies are likely to follow the moral leadership of giants like Unilever and Telenor to use their considerable influence to stop what many observers are calling the 21st Century’s worst full-blown genocide.

العمليات العسكرية مازالت مستمرة في ولاية راخين، ورغم أن الحكومة تدعي أنها تستهدف مسلحين إلا أنها تسببت في نزوح ما لا يقل عن 30٪ من السكان المدنيين الروهينجا من البلاد، وخلفت ربما الآلاف من القتلى؛ وها هي الآن تثير تساؤلات أخلاقية بشأن الاستثمار الأجنبي في بلد متهم بارتكاب جريمة الإبادة الجماعية.

حملة #WeAreAllRohingyaNow، وهي مبادرة تضم مجموعة من النشطاء المستقلين حول العالم، تسلط الضوء على دور مجتمع الأعمال الدولي في المساهمة في إيجاد حل للأزمة. وتقول جميلة حنان، مديرة الحملة: “إذا قمنا بمقارنة التغطية الإخبارية العالمية لأحداث ميانمار مع ما يتم ذكره في أخبار التجارة والأعمال، سنتصور لأول وهلة أنهم يتحدثون عن بلدين مختلفين!!” وتضيف: “من ناحية، تقول الأمم المتحدة إن ميانمار هي نموذج التطهير العرقي حسب الكتاب، ويدين مجلس الأمن سياسة الأرض المحروقة التي يتبعها الجيش؛ ومن ناحية أخرى، يتم وصف ميانمار بأنها المقصد الأفضل للاستثمار الأجنبي، بدون إبداء أي تردد أمام عمليات القتل والاغتصاب الجماعي، وتشريد مئات الآلاف من الأبرياء. يجب على المستثمرين اتخاذ موقف واضح من هذه القضية ما لم يرغبوا في ربط علامتهم التجارية بجرائم ضد الإنسانية”.

لقد تواصلت حملة #WeAreAllRohingyaNow مع الشركات متعددة الجنسيات المستثمرة في ميانمار وقامت بحثهم على الالتزام علنا بحماية الروهينجا، اللذين غالبا ما يشار إليهم على أنهم “الأقلية الأكثر اضطهادا في العالم”، كما قامت بحثهم على تأييد توصيات الأمم المتحدة لحل هذه الأزمة.

أول شركة تتجاوب مع هذه الدعوة كانت شركة يونيليفر، وهي ثالث أكبر شركة للسلع الاستهلاكية في العالم. وتقول حنان: “الرئيس التنفيذي للشركة، بول بولمان، تجاوب معنا على الفور، وبعد حملة إعلامية قصيرة، أكدت يونيليفر علنا على دعمها للروهينجا… ثم بعد حملة أطول بكثير، تمكنا من إقناع شركة الاتصالات النرويجية تلينور، وهي أيضا مستثمر رئيسي في ميانمار، على فهم مدى إلحاح القضية، فتعهدوا هم أيضا على التزامهم بأهمية مراعاة حقوق الإنسان فيم يتعلق بالروهينجا”.

يبدو أن إستراتيجية الحملة تحول اتجاه الرياح لصالح الجهود التي يقودها رجال الأعمال لإنهاء الإبادة الجماعية… فيوم السبت الماضي، انضم بول بولمان إلى وسم #WeAreAllRohingyaNow على تويتر، في تغريدة تؤكد على أهمية إحياء التعاطف في العلاقات الدولية، ونفترض أن نفس الشيء ينطبق على الأعمال التجارية أيضا. فها هي الشركات الكبرى بدأت تشك في حكمة ممارسة الأعمال التجارية في ظل التطهير العرقي المستمر، وحتى الحكومات أصبحت أكثر حساسية بشأن متابعة الاتفاقات التجارية مع ميانمار، إذ أنه في يوم 14 سبتمبر، قررت لجنة البرلمان الأوروبي المعنية بالتجارة الدولية تأجيل زيارتها إلى ميانمار إلى أجل غير مسمى بسبب تدهور حالة حقوق الإنسان في البلد. وقال رئيس اللجنة بيرند لانج فى بيان صحفى: “من الواضح انه في ظل هذه الظروف لن نتمكن من التصديق على اتفاقية استثمار مع ميانمار”.

ويقول شهيد بولسين، كبير الاستراتيجيين في الحملة: “تمتلك ولاية راخين أغلب الموارد غير المستغلة في ميانمار. وسيكون من الصعب جدا على المستثمرين الاستفادة من تنمية هذه الموارد دون اعتبارهم متواطئين في جرائم الجيش؛ لاسيما وأن هناك خططا للتنمية في المناطق التي تحدث فيها المذابح بالتحديد. علاوة على ذلك، فحتى الشركات التي ليس لها مصالح مباشرة في ولاية راخين، بدأ يتم النظر إليها على أنها عناصر تمكين لحملة الجيش بما أن النظام لم يواجه أي رد فعل اقتصادي من قبل المستثمرين، الأمر الذي يشجع الحكومة على تحدي الانتقادات الدولية”.

ولا تزال الحكومة في يانغون تعتقد أن سياستها الحديدية في ولاية راخين لن تنفر المستثمرين، فيقول يو أون نينغ أوو المدير العام لمديرية إدارة الاستثمارات والشركات، يوم الجمعة الماضي: “الصراعات المستمرة لا تؤثر على الاستثمارات الأجنبية، لذا فليس لدينا ما يدعو للقلق”. غير أن ادعاءه بأن رجال الأعمال “يهتمون بفرص عملهم” أكثر من اهتمامهم بانتهاكات حقوق الإنسان والقمع السياسي، يبدو أنه يتناقض مع ما أعرب عنه بول بولمان عندما قال في تغريدته على تويتر: “لقد نسينا كيف نغيث بعضنا البعض، ولكن التعاطف الإنساني هو مفتاح بقائنا…”

لقد أبرزت حملة #WeAreAllRohingyaNow دور القطاع الخاص في حل الأزمة في ميانمار، والمزيد من الشركات من المرجح أن تنضم إلى صف “القيادة الأخلاقية” الذي بدأه شركات عملاقة مثل يونيليفر وتلينور لاستخدام نفوذهم الكبير في إنهاء ما وصفه الكثير من المراقبين بأنه أسوأ إبادة جماعية تحدث في القرن الحادي والعشرين.

Corporate Social Responsibility and Genocide   المسئولية الاجتماعية للشركات والإبادة الجماعية

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

On August 25th, 2017, the government of Myanmar launched a large-scale military operation in Rakhine state ostensibly to combat a small group of Rohingya militants.  By all accounts, however, the Rohingya civilian population has suffered what amounts to collective punishment as the army pursues a scorched earth policy throughout the area; burning entire villages, and displacing hundreds of thousands of innocent people, and some estimates of the casualties run as high as 3,000 civilian deaths.

Collective punishment is a war crime, and many observers characterize Myanmar’s severe persecution of the Rohingya as ethnic cleansing.  The Rohingya population in Rakhine state has been reduced by approximately 30% in the less than 3 weeks since the military operation began.  It is difficult to not view what is happening as full-blown genocide.

Yet, multinational corporations and foreign investors from all over the world continue to flock to Myanmar hoping to benefit from that country’s untapped resources, many of which are found in precisely the same areas where military atrocities are taking place.  Indeed, the government in Yangon announced plans to build a Special Economic Zone in Maungdaw township, even as Rohingya inhabitants were being driven out, and their homes being burnt to the ground.

Does the international business community approve of what is happening in Rakhine?  Are they satisfied to extract oil and gas and minerals from Rakhine’s soil covered in Rohingya blood? Will they develop tourist resorts tomorrow on the beaches where today thousands of displaced families are huddled fearing for their lives?  Can they, in good conscience, erect their factories and warehouses and office buildings on land from which innocent Rohingya have been driven out by horrific violence? When every dollar of investment they pump into Myanmar inoculates the government from censure, how can the international business community avoid the charge of willing complicity with genocide?

We call upon major corporations and investors to display moral leadership in this time of urgent need; to refuse partnership with a government actively engaged in ethnic cleansing, and to use their considerable influence to turn the regime away from the path of genocide.

We say to those companies investing in Myanmar: Do not let your brand become associated with war crimes; do not let your company become complicit in crimes against humanity; do not let your shareholders become accomplices to genocide.    In Myanmar today, the price of profitability is innocent blood, and no business should be willing to pay that price.

في 25 أغسطس 2017، شنت حكومة ميانمار عملية عسكرية واسعة النطاق في ولاية راخين، ظاهرها هو مكافحة مجموعة صغيرة من مسلحي الروهينجا. غير أن المدنيين من الروهينجا قد عانوا الأمرين من العقاب الجماعي من هذه العملية، لأن الجيش استخدم سياسة الأرض المحروقة في جميع أنحاء المنطقة؛ فقام بحرق قرى بأكملها، وتشريد مئات الآلاف من الأبرياء، حتى أن بعض التقديرات أفادت بأن عدد الضحايا وصل إلى ما يقرب من 3000 قتيل من المدنيين.

العقاب الجماعي يعتبر جريمة حرب، والعديد من المراقبين يصفون الاضطهاد الشديد الذي تمارسه ميانمار على الروهينجا بأنه تطهير عرقي. وقد انخفض فعلا تعداد سكان الروهينجا في ولاية راخين بنحو 30٪ في أقل من 3 أسابيع منذ بدء العملية العسكرية، لذا من الصعب ألا نرى ما يحدث كإبادة جماعية كاملة.

ومع ذلك، فإن الشركات متعددة الجنسيات والمستثمرين الأجانب من جميع أنحاء العالم لا يزالون يتدفقون بالطوابير إلى ميانمار على أمل الاستفادة من الموارد غير المستغلة لهذا البلد، والكثير من هذه الموارد موجود في نفس المناطق التي تحدث فيها الفظائع العسكرية على وجه التحديد. بل أن الحكومة في يانجون أعلنت فعلا عن خطط لبناء منطقة اقتصادية خاصة في بلدة مونداو، وكان هذا متزامنا مع إخراج سكان الروهينجا من بيوتهم وحرق هذه البيوت بالكامل وتسويتها بالأرض.

هل يوافق مجتمع الأعمال الدولي على ما يحدث في راخين؟ هل هم راضون عن استخراج النفط والغاز والمعادن من تربة راخين المشبعة بدم الروهينجا؟ هل سيطورون المنتجعات السياحية غدا على شواطئ اجتمعت عليها آلاف العائلات النازحة اليوم خوفا على حياتهم؟ وهل يمكن لهم، وضمائرهم مرتاحة، أن ينشئوا مصانعهم ومستودعاتهم ومبانيهم المكتبية على أرض طرد منها الروهينجا الأبرياء بعد سلسلة من العنف المروع؟ وعندما يقوم كل دولار يضخونه من الاستثمارات بتحصين حكومة ميانمار من اللوم، كيف سيتجنب مجتمع الأعمال الدولي تهمة التواطؤ والتماهي مع الإبادة الجماعية؟

نحن ندعو الشركات الكبرى والمستثمرين إلى إظهار القيادة الأخلاقية في هذه اللحظة الفارقة من الحاجة الملحة؛ ورفض أي شراكة مع حكومة تشارك بنشاط في التطهير العرقي، واستخدام نفوذهم الكبير في تحويل النظام بعيدا عن مسار الإبادة الجماعية.

نحن نقول لتلك للشركات التي تستثمر في ميانمار: لا تجعلوا علاماتكم التجارية مرتبطة بجرائم الحرب؛ لا تجعلوا شركاتكم متواطئة في جرائم ضد الإنسانية؛ لا تجعلوا مساهميكم يتحولون لشركاء في الإبادة الجماعية. الوضع في ميانمار اليوم هو باختصار كالآتي: الدم البريء هو ثمن الربح… ولا أعتقد أن أي عمل تجاري مستعد أن يدفع هذا الثمن الباهظ من اسمه وسمعته وضميره.

Economic drivers of conflict                                         العوامل الاقتصادية المحفزة للنزاع

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

It is not true, of course, that human beings are motivated in what they do exclusively by material interest.  I don’t believe that at all, though critics of my writing often assume that I do.  Because I tend to write about economically driven conflicts, many people presume that I subscribe to Marxist thinking and the explanation that the sum total of human affairs and interactions are based on material self-interest. That explanation is demonstrably untrue even in each of our own individual lives in innumerable ways.

It is even demonstrable in our own interactions with the marketplace when we, for instance, buy goods we do not need, or which will go to waste, and the purchase of which actually depletes our wealth with no perceptible benefit to ourselves.  We do not make those purchases with our material self-interest in mind at all; we may do it for any number of reasons, but we certainly do not do it seeking to profit from squandering our money.

So no, if we are not driven, even in a large portion of our financial transactions, by the motive of material self-interest, it can hardly be stated that this is the motive behind everything else we do in life.

I think the confusion about this arises from the fact that I discuss corporate power and its influence on politics, on international affairs, and government policy.  But this is something entirely different from discussing the motives of private individuals.  Corporations are profit-driven, exclusively so, and they are legally obligated to be this way.  Material self-interest is their raison d’etre, full stop.  That is not a theory; it is a fact in their articles of incorporation.  If corporations are to be regarded as human beings, then, yes, they are the Marxist archetype of the pathologically mercenary individual.

Corporations are also tremendously powerful.  It can be argued that their extremely narrow purpose has helped them become so.  With a single prime objective of accumulating profit, and very few restriction in place on how they pursue this aim, corporations have been able to grow into massive entities controlling a huge proportion of the global economy.  This economic power inevitably includes political power; whether by means of direct funding of politicians and legislative lobbying, or by the sheer magnitude of their impact on “market forces” that can create de facto compulsion on governments to respond to circumstances that have been imposed by companies or coalitions of companies in any given society.

So no, people are not driven exclusively by economic concerns, but corporations are, and corporations wield unparalleled influence over state policy, and over the overall conditions under which entire populations live; which means that yes, most major conflicts, both domestically and internationally, are indeed driven by economics.  Again, this is not a theory, it is straightforward deduction from observable reality.  There is nothing conspiratorial about it.  There is no mystery.

The operational nature of corporations is transparent; they are dedicated to the perpetual increase in profits for their shareholders and not for anyone else; this is their function.  When they mobilize their power to serve this function, there is no surprise in that, nor is there any secrecy about it.  Though they may claim to be concerned about the environment or about social responsibility and so on, everyone should understand that even these claims are motivated by the drive for profit, because that is the real, legal, and sole purpose of corporations, and that is unapologetically and openly acknowledged.

When these powerful entities interact with weaker entities, for instance, with the governments of developing countries whose total GDP is often less than the revenues of multinational corporations; those who control these weaker entities must find ways to collaborate with these enormous institutions of private power which will enable them to survive and remain with some degree of authority still intact.  This usually means that such governments are forced, rather than defend their domestic interests, to instead manage the process of capitulation with corporate power to deliver their countries’ resources (including human resources) to the much more powerful entities looming across from them at the negotiating table.

I do not claim that corporations directly dictate to these governments precisely how they should do this; though that certainly does happen to some extent, particularly in terms of instituting economic reforms that are advantageous to foreign business; and we have seen instances of direct corporate involvement in military coups, armed conflicts, and political repression from Latin America to the Niger Delta to Aceh, Indonesia.  By and large, I believe that it is left to the governments themselves to decide how best to pursue their new function in service to corporate profitability.

This usually does not require much imagination in the developing world, since these governments are often already highly corrupt and exploitative in service to a small class of domestic elites.  It can be a fairly seamless transition to merely include an extra tier of authority over what is an already existing system of exploitation and control.  This is why military dictatorships are frequently preferred by corporate power for integration into the global economy; they have all the necessary mechanisms of coercion already in place and operating, and need very little instruction.  All they usually need is the creation of a democratic veneer; though even this is not a necessary requirement.

Identifying the economic motives behind conflicts is logical, not ideological, given the real existing power dynamics in the world today.  It has nothing to do with theories about what drives human beings, and everything to do with what drives corporations.

بالطبع ليس صحيحا، أن البشر مدفوعون إلى ما يفعلونه بالمصالح المادية فقط. أنا لا أعتقد هذا على الإطلاق، على الرغم من أن نقاد كتاباتي غالبا يفترضون هذا في، فلأنني أميل إلى الكتابة عن الصراعات التي تحفزها العوامل اقتصاديا، يفترض كثير من الناس أنني أميل إلى التفكير الماركسي وإلى التفسير القائل بأن مجموع الشؤون الإنسانية وتفاعلاتها تستند إلى المصلحة الذاتية المادية. ولكن هذا التفسير غير صحيح بشكل كبير حتى في حياتنا الفردية وبطرق لا حصر لها.

بل أننا يمكن أن نثبت هذا حتى من خلال تفاعلنا مع السوق عندما نشتري سلعا لا نحتاج إليها، أو أشياء ستذهب إلى النفايات، وكل هذا بالفعل يجعل ثرواتنا تتآكل دون فائدة ملموسة تعود علينا، فبالتأكيد نحن لا نفعل كل هذا ومصلحتنا الذاتية المادية في عين الاعتبار!! قد نفعله لأي عدد من الأسباب، ولكن بالتأكيد نحن لا نفعله بهدف التربح من تبديد أموالنا.

لذلك فإن كنا مدفوعين، حتى في جزء كبير من معاملاتنا المالية، بحافز من المصلحة الذاتية المادية، فلا يمكن أبدا أن نقول أن هذا هو الدافع وراء كل شيء آخر نقوم به في الحياة.

أعتقد أن الخلط حول هذا الأمر ينشأ عن حقيقة أنني أتحدث عن القوة المؤسسية وتأثيرها على السياسة، وعلى الشؤون الدولية، وسياسة الحكومات. ولكن هذا أمر مختلف تماما عن مناقشة دوافع الأفراد. الشركات هي التي تكون مدفوعة بالربح حصريا، وملزمة قانونيا بأن تتصرف بهذه الطريقة. المصلحة الذاتية المادية هي سبب وجودها ((نقطة)). وهذه ليست نظرية، بل هي حقيقة في مواد تأسيسها. فإن كنا نعتبر أن الشركات كائنات بشرية، ففي هذه الحالة، نعم، هي النموذج ماركسي للفرد الجشع بشكل مرضي.

بالإضافة إلى هذا فالشركات قوية بشكل كبير، ويمكن القول إن هدفها الضيق للغاية هو الذي ساعدها على تحقيق ذلك. فمع هدف رئيسي واحد عبارة عن “تراكم الأرباح”، ومع قلة القيود المفروضة على كيفية تحقيق هذا الهدف، تمكنت الشركات من النمو لتصبح كيانات ضخمة تسيطر على نسبة كبيرة من الاقتصاد العالمي. وتشمل هذه القوة الاقتصادية حتما السلطة السياسية؛ سواء عن طريق التمويل المباشر للسياسيين أو ممارسة الضغوط التشريعية، أو من خلال الحجم الهائل لتأثيرها على “قوى السوق” التي تمكنها من خلق “أمر واقع” يجبر الحكومات على للاستجابة للظروف التي تفرضها الشركات أو تحالفات الشركات في أي المجتمع.

لذلك فلا، الناس غير مدفوعون حصريا بالمخاوف الاقتصادية، ولكن الشركات هي التي ينطبق عليها هذا الوصف، والشركات تمارس تأثير لا مثيل له على سياسة الدول، وعلى الظروف العامة التي يعيش فيها السكان كلهم؛ وهو ما يعني أن معظم الصراعات الرئيسية، على الصعيدين المحلي والدولي، مدفوعين فعلا بالاقتصاد. مرة أخرى، هذه ليست نظرية، ولكنه استنباط مباشر من الواقع الملحوظ. ولا توجد أية “مؤامرات” هنا في هذا الموضوع، فهو ليس شيئا غامضا.

والطبيعة التشغيلية للشركات شفافة؛ فهي مكرسة لتحقيق زيادة دائمة في الأرباح لمساهميها وليس لغيرهم؛ وهذه هي وظيفتها. أي أنهم عندما يحشدون قوتهم لخدمة هذه المهمة، فهذا شيء لا يثير الدهشة ، كما أنه ليس أمرا سريا. وعلى الرغم من أنها قد تدعي أنها تشعر بالقلق إزاء البيئة أو المسؤولية الاجتماعية وهلم جرا، إلا أنه علينا جميعا أن نعلم أن كل هذا مدفوعا بالربح أيضا، لأن الربح هو الغرض الحقيقي والقانوني، الوحيد للشركات، وهم يعترفون بها علنا.

وعندما تتفاعل هذه الكيانات القوية مع الكيانات الأضعف، مثل حكومات البلدان النامية التي يقل إجمالي الناتج المحلي فيها في معظم الأحيان عن إيرادات الشركات متعددة الجنسيات؛ يجب على من يسيطرون على هذه الكيانات الضعيفة أن يجدوا سبل للتعاون مع هذه المؤسسات الضخمة من السلطة الخاصة التي تبقيهم في كراسيهم السلطوية وتبقي لهم درجة ثابتة من السطوة. وهذا يعني عادة أن مثل هذه الحكومات تضطر، بدلا من أن تدافع عن مصالحها الداخلية، أن تدير عملية الاستسلام لقوة الشركات من أجل تقديم موارد بلدانهم (بما في ذلك الموارد البشرية) للكيانات الأكثر قوة التي تلوح في الأفق على طاولة المفاوضات.

أنا لا أدعي أن الشركات تملي مباشرة لهذه الحكومات كيفية القيام بهذا؛ على الرغم من أن ذلك يحدث بالتأكيد إلى حد ما، لا سيما من حيث إقامة إصلاحات اقتصادية مفيدة للأعمال التجارية الأجنبية؛ وقد شهدنا حالات تورط الشركات بشكل مباشر في انقلابات عسكرية ونزاعات مسلحة وقمع سياسي من أمريكا اللاتينية إلى دلتا النيجر إلى آتشيه بإندونيسيا. وبشكل عام، أعتقد أن هذا سيتيح للحكومات فرصة أن تقرر أفضل السبل لمتابعة وظيفتها الجديدة في خدمة ربحية الشركات.

وهذا عادة لا يتطلب الكثير من الخيال في العالم النامي، لأن هذه الحكومات غالبا ما تكون فاسدة للغاية واستغلالية في خدماتها التي تقدمها فقط لفئة صغيرة من النخب المحلية، وهذا يتم بشكل سلس إلى حد ما عن طريق إدراج مستوى إضافي للسلطة على ما هو قائم بالفعل للاستغلال والسيطرة. وهذا هو السبب في أن السلطة الديكتاتورية العسكرية كثيرا ما تفضل السلطة من أجل الاندماج في الاقتصاد العالمي؛ فهم يملكون جميع آليات الإكراه اللازمة ويعملون بها، ويحتاجون إلى القليل جدا من التعليمات. وكل ما يحتاجونه عادة هو خلق قشرة ديموقراطية، وحتى هذه قد لا تكون شرطا ضروريا.

إن تحديد الدوافع الاقتصادية الكامنة وراء الصراعات أمر منطقي وليس إيديولوجي، بالنظر إلى ديناميات القوة الحالية القائمة في العالم اليوم. والأمر لا علاقة له بالنظريات المتعلقة بدوافع البشر، ولكن له علاقة بدوافع الشركات.

ASEAN’s economic weapon   الآسيان كسلاح اقتصادي

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

The most important thing that ASEAN brings to the negotiating table on the Rohingya issue is access to the Southeast Asian market.  It is for access to this market that multinational corporations are choosing to move to Myanmar.  It is of paramount importance to these companies to be able to increase their share of a consumer pool of over 650 million consumers, who are projected to be spending around $280 billion a year by 2025.  This market potential is ASEAN’s greatest bargaining chip, and they can leverage it to bring the genocide in Arakan to a screeching halt.

If ASEAN as an organization adopted a policy along the lines of the BDS Movement; essentially declaring that companies investing in Myanmar will not be welcome in the region unless and until the Myanmar regime ceases its military operations against the Rohingya, and begins taking concrete steps to implement United Nations recommendations (including the restoration of Rohingya citizenship); multinational corporations would suddenly have a solid motive to intervene in the conflict, which would almost undoubtedly end the conflict.

Technically, such a policy would not constitute a violation of ASEAN’s “non-interference” clause, insofar as the target of the policy would not be Myanmar itself, but companies investing in Myanmar.  Theoretically, both the Myanmar government and the companies would still have the choice to maintain the status quo; but practically speaking, this would be no choice at all.  A boycott and divestment policy would not legally infringe on Myanmar’s political sovereignty, but it would nevertheless apply an irresistible level of pressure.

From a strictly Machiavellian point of view, it is feasible that this strategy could gain traction with the leaders of ASEAN; particularly Malaysia and Vietnam; because frankly, it is in no one’s interest here to see Myanmar develop into a business hub of any kind.  That is probably why we have seen very little from ASEAN in terms of a proactive response.  Instability in Myanmar is useful for almost all other regional economies.  Adopting a policy that undermines Myanmar’s economic ambitions, while also effectively bringing pressure to bear to stop ethnic cleansing might not be too difficult to sell to ASEAN leaders.

If the profitability of their investments in Myanmar was conditional upon bringing the genocide to an end; that is; if they could not make money in the Southeast Asian market while investing in a country with a genocidal regime, multinational corporations would have an incentive to see to it that the regime ceased being genocidal.  And yes, they have the power to do that; particularly Chinese companies.

If you are thinking that Myanmar will defy corporate pressure to be allowed to continue with the genocide, I think you may not accurately understand the core economic reasons behind the genocide in the first place.  It is not an accident of history that the pogroms against the Rohingya coincide with Myanmar’s attempt to integrate into the world economy following the lifting of sanctions, and the central government’s scramble to secure total control over the periphery’s natural resources in order to consolidate their power and establish themselves as efficient collaborators with the global owners of capital.

Even amidst the current savage crackdown, the government announced plans to develop a Special Economic Zone in Maungdaw; basically stating the reason for the “clearance” operations in the area.

No multinational corporations will be willing to sacrifice access to the ASEAN market for the sake of the market in Myanmar; the only reason they are IN Myanmar is to reach the regional market.  This is the greatest weapon ASEAN holds with which they can defend the Rohingya.

It bears reiterating though, that even if the leaders of ASEAN will not or cannot adopt such a policy (possibly they may encounter legal issues pertaining to free trade agreements); it is certainly within the power of consumers in the ASEAN region to impose the same policy by their own initiative through their own market choices; this is precisely what the #WeAreAllRohingyaNow Campaign has been recommending, and it is something all activists concerned with this issue should be working on organizing at a grassroots level, with or without the participation of political leaders.

 

أهم شيء يجب أن تطرحه رابطة الآسيان (رابطة أمم جنوب شرق آسيا) على طاولة المفاوضات بشأن قضية الروهينجا هو الوصول إلى سوق جنوب شرق آسيا. فمن أجل الوصول إلى هذا السوق تختار الشركات متعددة الجنسيات أن تنتقل إلى ميانمار، ومن الأهمية القصوى لهذه الشركات أن تكون قادرة على زيادة حصتها من إجمالي مستهلكين يفوق تعداده 650 مليون مستهلك من المتوقع أن ينفقون ما يعادل 280 مليار دولار سنويا بحلول عام 2025. إمكانات هذا السوق هي أكبر صفقة مساومة تملكها رابطة الآسيان، ويمكنهم الاستفادة من هذا السلاح في إيقاف الإبادة الجماعية في أراكان فورا.

فإن اعتمدت رابطة أمم جنوب شرق آسيا كمنظمة سياسة على غرار حركة المقاطعة وسحب الاستثمارات وفرض العقوبات (BDS)؛ من خلال الإعلان بشكل رسمي أن الشركات التي تستثمر في ميانمار لن تكون موضع ترحيب في المنطقة ما لم يوقف نظام ميانمار عملياته العسكرية ضد الروهينجا، ثم البدء في اتخاذ خطوات ملموسة لتنفيذ توصيات الأمم المتحدة (بما في ذلك استعادة الجنسية الروهينجية)؛ هنا ستجد الشركات متعددة الجنسيات لديها فجأة دافع قوي للتدخل في الصراع، مما سيؤدي إلى إنهاء الصراع بلا شك.

من الناحية الفنية، هذه السياسة لن تشكل انتهاكا لشرط “عدم التدخل” الذي وضعته رابطة أمم جنوب شرقي آسيا، حيث أن هدف السياسة لن يكون ميانمار نفسها، بل الشركات التي تستثمر في ميانمار. ومن الناحية النظرية، فإن كل من حكومة ميانمار والشركات سيظل لديهم خيار الإبقاء على الوضع الراهن، ولكن من الناحية العملية، لن يكون هذا الخيار ممكنا على الإطلاق. فسياسة المقاطعة وسحب الاستثمارات لن تنتهك سيادة ميانمار السياسية، ولكنها ستطبق مستوى من الضغوط يصعب مقاومته.

أما لو نظرنا من وجهة نظر ماكيافيلية بحته، فمن الممكن أن تكتسب هذه الإستراتيجية زخما مع قادة رابطة أمم جنوب شرق آسيا؛ ولا سيما ماليزيا وفيتنام؛ لأنه بصراحة، ليس من مصلحة أحد هناك أن يرى ميانمار تتطور إلى محور أعمال من أي نوع. وربما كان هذا هو السبب في أننا لم نشهد سوى القليل جدا من الاستجابات الاستباقية لرابطة أمم جنوب شرقي آسيا. فعدم الاستقرار في ميانمار مفيد لجميع الاقتصادات الإقليمية تقريبا، بالتالي فتبني سياسة تقوض الطموحات الاقتصادية لميانمار، وفي نفس الوقت تضغط بفاعلية على وقف التطهير العرقي قد لا تكون شيئا من الصعب بيعه لقادة الرابطة.

فإن كانت ربحية استثماراتهم في ميانمار مشروطة بإنهاء الإبادة الجماعية؛ أي أن لم يتمكنوا من كسب المال في سوق جنوب شرق آسيا من استثمارهم في بلد يتبع نظامه إبادة جماعية، هنا ستجد الشركات متعددة الجنسيات حافز للضغط من أجل إيقاف النظام عن الإبادة. ونعم، هم لديهم القدرة على القيام بذلك؛ وخاصة الشركات الصينية.

إذا كنتم ترون أن ميانمار ستتحدى ضغط الشركات للسماح لها بمواصلة الإبادة الجماعية، فأعتقد أنكم لا تفهمون بدقة الأسباب الاقتصادية الأساسية وراء الإبادة الجماعية في المقام الأول. فالأمر ليس من قبيل الحادثة أو الصدفة التاريخية أن تتزامن المذبحة ضد الروهينجا مع محاولة ميانمار للاندماج في الاقتصاد العالمي بعد رفع العقوبات، وتدافع الحكومة المركزية لتأمين السيطرة الكاملة على الموارد الطبيعية للدولة من أجل توطيد قوتها و وتأسيس نفسها كعميل فعال لأصحاب رأس المال العالمي.

وحتى في خضم حملة القمع الوحشية الحالية، أعلنت الحكومة عن خطط لتطوير منطقة اقتصادية خاصة في مونجداو؛ مما يشير أساسا إلى سبب عمليات “التطهير والتهجير” في المنطقة.

لن تكون هناك شركات متعددة الجنسيات على استعداد للتضحية بالوصول إلى سوق الرابطة من أجل سوق ميانمار؛ فالسبب الوحيد لوجودهم في ميانمار هو الوصول إلى السوق الإقليمية، لذا فهذا هو أعظم سلاح للآسيان يمكن أن تدافع به عن الروهينجا.

وأكرر مرة ثانية أنه حتى لو لم يرد قادة رابطة أمم جنوب شرقي آسيا أن يعتمدوا هذه السياسة أو لم يتمكنوا من هذا (بسبب مسائل قانونية تتعلق باتفاقات التجارة الحرة مثلا)؛ إلا أنه من المؤكد أنه سيكون في إمكان المستهلكين في منطقة الآسيان أن يفرضوا هم بأنفسهم هذه السياسة بمبادرة خاصة منهم عبر خياراتهم الشرائية؛ هذا هو بالضبط ما توصي به حملة #WeAreAllRohingyaNow ، وهو نفس الشيء الذي يجب على كل الناشطين المعنيين بهذه المسألة أن يعملوا على تنظيمه على مستوى القاعدة الشعبية، مع أو بدون مشاركة القادة السياسيين.

The corporate elephant in the room                                         فيل “الشركات الكبرى” في الغرفة

لقراءة المقال مترجم إلى العربية انتقل إلى الأسفل

A major part of the equation in Myanmar is almost entirely missing from the discussion; perhaps the primary part of the equation: economics.

It cannot be responsibly regarded as coincidental that the areas of Rakhine in which the worst atrocities have been committed are also areas in which the government has, or plans to have, significant economic development projects. There were massacres in Sittwe in 2012  at the starting point of the Shwe Oil/Gas pipeline to China,  and violence connected to the Kyaukphyu Special Economic Zone (SEZ), and now amidst the current military operations the government announced the planned development of a new SEZ in Maungdaw once the situation has “calmed down”.  What is meant by “calm” can be easily guessed.  It means, “thorough subjugation through violence”.

The Buddhist versus Muslim narrative is superficial at best.  As is the official story of the government that they are battling “insurgents”.  Yes, the conflict is playing out as a religious and ethnic struggle, and yes, there is a small group of armed Rohingya who claim to be defending their people (though in reality they are doing nothing but provoke reprisals and justify the regime’s repression).  But these are little more than the modalities of how a fundamentally economic conflict is being pursued.

There can be no realistic expectation of resolving this matter unless and until the economic motive is addressed.  This is going to require activists to begin focusing their attention on private sector players; those who stand to benefit from the repression in Rakhine, and from their collaboration with the central government.  Foreign investors and multinational corporations play a decisive role in this conflict, even though their presence is in the background; and even though no one is talking about them.

At the very least, activists and campaigners need to call upon companies invested in Myanmar to publicly condemn the violence and demand a full cessation of military operations immediately.  Now, business does not have to respond to activists, but they do have to respond to their customers.  This means that we all, each and every one of us, need to deliver a message to those multinationals investing in Myanmar that we will not support their profitability anywhere if they do not support our demands in Rakhine.

If companies begin to see that the government’s policy against the Rohingya is interfering with their business interests, they will apply pressure on the regime to change.  But if their business interests remain intact, I’m afraid that nothing else we try to do will succeed in halting the genocide.

هناك شق كبير من المعادلة في ميانمار مفقود بشكل كلي من النقاش الدائر؛ وهذا الجزء ربما يكون هو الجزء الأساسي من المعادلة وهو: الاقتصاد.

لا يمكن عقليا أن نعتبر الأمر صدفة أن تكون منطقة راخين التي ترتكب فيها أسوأ الفظائع هي أيضا نفس المنطقة التي تعتزم الحكومة (أو تخطط) أن تقيم فيها مشاريع هامة للتنمية الاقتصادية. لقد كانت هناك مذابح في سيتوي في عام 2012 عند بداية خط أنابيب النفط والغاز “شوي” الذي ينتهي إلى الصين، ثم امتد العنف حتى وصل المنطقة الاقتصادية الخاصة (SEZ) لكيوكفيو، والآن في ظل العمليات العسكرية الحالية أعلنت الحكومة عن خطتها لتطوير جديد في المنطقة الاقتصادية الخاصة بمونداو (Maungdaw) فور أن “تهدأ” الأمور، وطبعا يمكننا أن نتخيل بسهولة المقصود من “الهدوء” هنا: “الإخضاع الشامل باستخدام العنف”.

السردية البوذية مقابل السردية الإسلامية تعتبر سطحية في أحسن الأحوال، تماما مثل القصة الرسمية للحكومة التي تقاتل “المتمردين”. لا ننكر أن الصراع يأخذ الشكل الديني والعرقي، كما لا ننكر أن هناك مجموعة صغيرة مسلحة من الروهينجا يدعون أنهم يدافعون عن شعبهم (على الرغم من أنهم في الواقع لا يفعلون سوى إثارة الانتقام وتبرير قمع النظام)، ولكن كل هذا ليس إلا طريقة من الطرائق التي يتم بها متابعة أي صراع يكون اقتصادي في جوهري.

لا يمكن أن يكون هناك توقع واقعي لحل هذه المسألة ما لم يتم التصدي للدوافع الاقتصادية. ويتطلب ذلك من الناشطين البدء في تركيز اهتمامهم على الجهات الفاعلة في القطاع الخاص؛ الذين يستفيدون من القمع في راخين، ومن تعاونهم مع الحكومة المركزية. فالمستثمرون الأجانب والشركات متعددة الجنسيات يؤدون دورًا حاسمًا في هذا الصراع، على الرغم من وجودهم في الخلفية؛ وعلى الرغم من أن لا أحد يتحدث عنهم.

فعلى أقل تقدير، يتعين على النشطاء والناشطين أن يطالبوا الشركات المستثمرة في ميانمار أن تدين العنف علنا وأن تطالب بالإيقاف الكامل للعمليات العسكرية فورا. وأصحاب هذه الأعمال من شركات وغيرها، ليسوا في حاجة للتجاوب مع النشطاء إن لم يريدوا، ولكن سيتعين عليهم التجاوب مع عملائهم. وهذا يعني أننا جميعا، أي كل واحد منا، يجب أن يعمل على إيصال رسالة إلى هذه الشركات متعددة الجنسيات التي تستثمر في ميانمار بأننا لن ندعم ربحيتهم في أي مكان إن لم يدعموا مطالبنا في راخين.

إذا بدأت الشركات ترى أن سياسة الحكومة ضد الروهينجا تتداخل مع مصالحها التجارية، فسيضغطون فورا على النظام لتغيير سياسته. ولكن إذا بقيت مصالحهم التجارية سليمة، أخشى ألا ينجح أي شيء آخر نحاول القيام به في إيقاف الإبادة الجماعية.